william lloyd garrison

In Glogpedia

by WendyKimmy
Last updated 10 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
william lloyd garrison

William Lloyd Garrison

Events in U.S.:Timeline1830: Indian Removal Act moves eastern Indians west of Mississippi1832: New-England Anti-Slavery Society was founded1833: American Anti-Slavery Society was founded1838: Cherokee "Trail of Tears"1843-65: president of American Anti-Slavery Society1850-1870: Plains Indians cede land in exchange for reservations1854: Burned the constitution at an abolitionist meeting; Republican Party formed for abolition of slavery1857: Dred Scott decision1863: Lincoln issues Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves

Life of a Journalist Timeline:1820s: got his start as printer, then writer and editor of his hometown paper, the Newburyport Herald1828: Denounced the American Colonization Society; editor of the National Philanthropist (Boston) newspaper; co-editor of the Genius of Universal Emancipation (antislavery editor Benjamin Lundy)1828-29: editor of the Journal of the Times (Bennington, Vt.)1830: Joined Abolition movement1831: Founded anti-slavery newspaper "The Liberator"1834: Married Helen Eliza Benson1843: led the society to adopt the doctrine of "No Union with Slaveholders,"1865: retired but continued to press for women's suffrage, temperance, and free trade.

Benjamin Lundy's Genius of Universal Emancipation

Newburyport Herald newspaper

William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) was a prominent anti-slavery newspaper editor. He launched his newspaper called The Liberator around 1831. He is best-known as a Civil War-era abolitionist that denounced several acts of slavery. Born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, Garrison started his journalism life as a printer, then a writer and editor of his hometown paper, the Newburyport Herald in the 1820s. He later became editor of different newspapers such as the National Philanthropist in Boston of 1828 and the Journal of the Times in Vermont of 1828–29. Garrison joined the abolitionist movement, but at this time, the decisions for slavery were divided. He advocated for the immediate abolition of slavery, while others thought a gradual process would be the best approach. Garrison believed an "immediate and complete emancipation" of slaves was the right decision, thus he created The Liberator on Jan. 1, 1831 and he co-founded the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833.

Thomas Paine, publisher of pro-independence pamphlet Common Sense, created the saying, "Our country is the world—our countrymen are mankind," which became Garrison’s motto for his newspaper. Overall, Garrison’s argument was to be heard. He warned his readers, "I am in earnest— I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard." Furthermore, Garrison succeeded in voicing his opinion in his newspaper. But despite his lack of subscriptions and money, he continued to strive to abolish slavery. He continued his newspaper for approximately thirty-five years until slavery was finally legally ended through the Thirteenth Amendment. writer and editor of his hometown paper, the Newburyport Herald in the 1820s. He later became editor of different newspapers such as the National Philanthropist in Boston of 1828 and the Journal of the Times in Vermont of 1828–29.Garrison joined the abolitionist movement, but at this time, the decisions for slavery were divided. He advocated for the immediate abolition of slavery, while others thought a gradual process would be the best approach. Garrison believed an "immediate and complete emancipation" of slaves was the right decision, thus he created The Liberator on Jan. 1, 1831 and he co-founded the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833.Thomas Paine, publisher of pro-independence pamphlet Common Sense, created the saying, "Our country is the world—our countrymen are mankind," which became Garrison’s motto for his newspaper. Overall, Garrison’s argument was to be heard. He warned his readers, "I am in earnest— I will not equivocate—I will not excuse—I will not retreat a single inch—and I will be heard." Furthermore, Garrison succeeded in voicing his opinion in his newspaper. But despite his lack of subscriptions and money, he continued to strive to abolish slavery. He continued his newspaper for approximately thirty-five years until slavery was finally legally ended through the Thirteenth Amendment. The majority of Garrison’s newspaper focused on the abolition of slavery. They incorporated much about the slavery news and Garrison’s strong opinion towards slavery. Contrastingly, he influenced modern newspaper by its focus on different categories: News, Entertainment, Business, Science/Technology, Health, and Sports. Like The Liberator, modern newspapers have an opinion piece, but the amount published in the newspaper is less. Modern newspapers report news without imposing much of their feelings. However, The Liberator, as an advocating anti-slavery newspaper, emphasized opinions and statements to persuade people to abolish slavery. Nonetheless, Garrison’s era was faced with the risk of the government stopping their publication. Nowadays, however, people are protected through the First Amendment, freedom of press, to protect the journalistic rights. When the Civil War erupted, Garrison supported President Abraham Lincoln and encouraged black soldiers. Once the war ended and slavery was abolished, Garrison retired The Liberator and continued to press for women's suffrage, temperance, and free trade.

Statue of William Lloyd Garrison

American Anti-Slavery Society

Citation:"William Lloyd Garrison: Biography from Answers.com." Answers.com: Wiki Q&A Combined with Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus, and Encyclopedias. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.answers.com/topic/william-lloyd-garrison>."William Lloyd Garrison." Spartacus Educational - Home Page. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USASgarrison.htm>."American History Timeline: 1780-2005." Animated Atlas of American History. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.animatedatlas.com/timeline.html>."YouTube - William Lloyd Garrisons Life." YouTube - Broadcast Yourself. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qnf4mNgi19Y&feature=related>."Africans in America/Part 4/William Lloyd Garrison (Photo) Close-up." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2950b.html>."Anti-Slavery Society." Spartacus Educational - Home Page. Web. 16 Dec. 2010. <http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAantislavery.htm>.

Video about the life of William Lloyd Garrison

By Kimmy Ny & Wendy Chen


Tags

Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.