William Gilbert

by emmagranger
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Scientific Biographies
Grade:
8

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William Gilbert

William Gilbert

William Gilbert was a scientist and English phsyician. He was one of the first scientists to research the features of lodestone, a magnetic iron ore. What he found was published in his informative, nonfiction book, De Magnete ("On the Magnet"). The book also discusses electricity, a term which he is given partial credit for. It was important because it spread rapidly thoughout Europe and was estblished as the standard work on magnetic and electrical phenomena.

Most of his discoveries came from doing experiments and testing old folk tales. He would test questions like the following; does the magnetic effect of the compass needle become impaired by garlic? My sources did not really say whether or not he worked alone or with others. However, Galileo and Johannes Kepler were interested in his work. William attended St. John's College, Cambridge. He didn't have any special talents. He was really one of the first scientists to look into what he did so he didn't really build on anyone's work.

-wikipedia.org/-http://galileo.rice.edu/sci/gilbert.html-http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/gilbert_william.shtml-http://www.magnet.fsu.edu/education/tutorials/pioneers/gilbert.html

-William's zodiac sign was a gemini.-Late in life Gilbert was Queen Elizabeth I's and King James I's physicians.-William death was mostly due to the plauge.

Gilbert's book was published in the year 1600. His ideas were most certainly accepted by pretty much everyone. They influenced people around Europe, and set up standard information regarding electricty and magnets.

Gilbert didn't do his work in one specific place. It can take a long time to write a book, and I'm sure he didn't do all of his writing in one place. He lived in London though, and also traveled.

By Emma Roberts

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