When Kids Can't Read

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by cluikart
Last updated 3 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Reading Comprehension
Grade:
1,2,3,4,5

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When Kids Can't Read

1. Emergent- Pre-K through 1st grade; scribbles to writing words with correct initial and final consonants (team as tm)2. Letter Name- Grades 1-2; spell using the names of letters to spell words; digraphs and blends are often incomplete. (team as tem)3. Within-Word Pattern- Grades 2-4; Short vowel sounds spelled correctly; attempts at long vowel patterns; (team as teme, teem, or team); r-controlled vowels, complex blends, and sliders ou, ow, aw, oi, etc.4. Syllable Juncture: Grades 3-8; vowel patterns for single syllable words correct; attempting multisyllabic words with affixes; dropping y, double consonant rules5. Derivational Constancy- Usually happens between grades 5-8 and extends through adulthood; continued practice with root words and word relationships;

A "One List Fits All" Mentality

When Kids Can't Read

Inferencing: The ability to connect what is in the text with what is in the mind to create and educated guess.

Inferencing

Spelling

"As spelling knowledge improves, word recognition improves...As you observe your students carefully, you'll probably see that students who struggle with word recognition struggle with spelling (Beers, 2003).

5 Stages of Spelling to Consider when Differentiating Lists

Skilled Readers: 1. recognize the antecedents for pronouns2. figure out the meaning of unkown words from context clues3. figure out the grammatical function of an unknown word4. understand intonation of characters' words5. identify characters' beliefs, personalities, and motivations6. understand characters' relationships to one another7. provide details about the setting8. provide explanations for events or ideas that are presented in the text9. offer details for events or their own explanations of the events presented in the text10. understand the author's biases11. understand the authors point of view/ narrator's P.O.V..12. relate what is happening in the text ot their own knowledge of the world (make connections)13. offer conclusions from facts presented in the text

Choose a few times throughout the day to model a short passage. Use this time to think aloud how you make inferences. Are you making "text-based or knowledge-based" connections? p. 63

Model, Model, Model

*Make a list with students of what they are interested in.* Share thin chapter books, with short chapters, and some illustrations so they are not feeling overwhelmed. * Characters and narrators that are straight-forward, where there isn't a lot of inferencing, that are their age, and can make connections to their own lives*Books that have twisted and action-packed plots, offer humor, and or mystery and the conflict is very obvious

How do I help my reluctant readers to choose the right books?

* List on Monday and test on Friday leads to rote-memorizationand forgetting the words by next Monday. It also separates reading from spelling when they go hand in hand. * This doesn't mean that 23 students need 23 different lists. Teachers should use the 5 Stages of Spelling to differentiate lists. *Identify where students' spelling ability is based on the stages. They will usually fall in 2 to 3 stages, requiring 2 or 3 different lists. Set aside 20-25 minutes twice/ week for students to practice their word skills with word sorts. Great Menu idea! Teachers meet with groups as they practice and utilize this time for reading or flexible group practice.

FICTION

* THE JOY OF TEXT FEATURES: MANY OF THEM!*TWO-PAGE LAYOUTS WITH BASIC INFORMATION, LOTS OF COLORFUL TEXT FEATURES*DOES IT HAVE TO BE A BOOK OR CAN IT BE DIRECTIONS, WEBSITES, ARTICLES, MAGAZINES, ETC.?*KEEPING IT THIN CAN STILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE*PERSONALIZE IT: LET STUDENTS CHOOSE THEIR TOPICS*VOCABULARY IS DEFINED IN CONTEXT*SELL IT TO YOUR READERS! HAVE THEM SHOP, READ SECTIONS ALOUD, ASK QUESTIONS WITH A CLIFFHANGER, ADVERTISE THE BOOK IN A PRESENTATION or BOARD BUILDER, STUDENTS SHARE, AND MAKE TIME TO BRAG ABOUT THE AUTHORS.

NONFICTION


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