Wetlands: Florida Everglades

In Glogpedia

by stacical
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Ecosystems
Grade:
5,6

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Wetlands: Florida Everglades

Wetlands: Florida Everglades

Did you know... - Wetlands are areas of standing water that support aquatic plants. Marshes, swamps, and bogs are all considered wetlands. Plant species adapted to the very moist and humid conditions are called hydrophytes. These include pond lilies, cattails, sedges, tamarack, and black spruce. Marsh flora also include such species as cypress and gum. Wetlands have the highest species diversity of all ecosystems. (Aquatic Biome)

Wetlands are not considered freshwater ecosystems as there are some, such as salt marshes, that have high salt concentrations—these support different species of animals, such as shrimp, shellfish, and various grasses. (Aquatic Biome)

Along with the development to accommodate the growing population in FL, the delicate balance in the everglades is being threatened from several sources….nutrient pollution, such as that coming from agricultural runoff and other fertilizers, the sulfur in this agricultural fertilizer, through a complex series of biological and chemical processes, leads to accumulations of toxic mercury as well as over-drainage. All of this is harming the unique environments many plants and animals in the everglades need for survival. ("How Is the Everglades," 2014)

Come visit the Florida Everglades!

Click to listen to the sounds of the Everglades

A map of the Florida Everglades

Mangrove Trees

Florida's River of Grass - The Everglades: Part 2: Native and Invasive Species

Click on me to to find out more about panters in the everglades!

While some of its flora and fauna are widely recognized, theEverglades also is comprised of many hundreds, if notthousands, of lesser-known plants, animals and fishthat are part of a living, dynamic ecosystem.

Many species of amphibians, reptiles, birds (such as ducks and waders), and furbearers can be found in the wetlands. (Aquatic Biome)

Click on the heron to learn more about him!


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.