W.E.B Du Bois

In Glogpedia

by JessRios
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Historical biographies
Grade:
11

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W.E.B Du Bois

-Born on February 23, 1868, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts-Identified himself as "mulatto,"-Attended school with whites-Moved to Nashville, Tennessee- First encountered Jim Crow laws in Nashville, Tennesee- Attended Fisk University- Earned bachelor's degree - Transferred to Harvard University-paid his way with money from summer jobs, scholarships and loans from friends.-Selected for a study-abroad program at the University of Berlin.-Studied with some of the most prominent social scientists of his day- Exposed to political perspectives-First African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1895

Later life

-Was the best known spokesperson for African-American rights during the first half of the 20th century- Co-founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909-Died in Ghana on August 27, 1963-Supporter of Communism

Works

-The Philadelphia Negro (1899)-The Negro in Business (1899)-The Souls of Black Folk (1903)-Voice of the Negro II (September 1905)-John Brown: A Biography (1909)-Efforts for Social Betterment among Negro Americans (1909)-The Negro (1915)-The Gift of Black Folk (1924)-Black Reconstruction in America (1935)-Black Folk, Then and Now (1939)-Color and Democracy: Colonies and Peace (1945)-The Encyclopedia of the Negro (1946)-The World and Africa (1946)-Peace Is Dangerous (1951)-I Take My Stand for Peace (1951)-In Battle for Peace (1952)

Citations

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2fR5AnIckA#t=101http://www.upenn.edu/spotlights/w-e-b-du-bois-profound-cultural-influencehttp://www.biography.com/people/web-du-bois-9279924#synopsis

Early life

W. E. B. Du Bois

Education is that whole system of human training within and without the school house walls, which molds and develops men.

It is a peculiar sensation, this double-consiousness, this sense of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity

A little less complaint and whining, and a little more dogged work and manly striving, would do us more credit than a thousand civil rights bills.

Influence


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