Weather Types

by SammyD9
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Earth Sciences
Grade:
9

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Weather Types

Weather Types

Dust StormDust storms are created by winds moving across an arid region. Many times a strong dry cold front is the mechanism that creates the dust or sand storm. As strong winds move across an arid landscape, sand or dirt is picked up from the ground.

FogFog is a stratus cloud on the ground.

IceFreezing rain - known as "ice" occurs when a thin layer of freezing or below freezing air exists near the earth's surface. Typically this occurs when snow falls into warmer air changing the precipitation into rain.

HailRecent studies suggest that super cooled water droplets are carried by strong updrafts in thunderstorms. A small ice particle forms and grows as "waves" of supercooled water droplets continue to bump into the ice particle. The hailstone is kept aloft by the strong updraft. The stronger the updraft the greater the force to keep the heavier hailstones aloft. The hailstone eventually falls to the grown when the the weight is too great for it to remain aloft or when it gets pushed out of the updraft.

RainRain is precipitation in liquid form. Liquid precipitation can occur as mist, drizzle, or rain.

HurricanesHurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere.

LightningLightning is simply a discharge of electricity in the atmosphere.

SleetSleet is transparent frozen raindrops. Sleet or ice pellets are created when snow falls into air above freezing and melts into rain drops.

SnowSnow is the accumulation of crystal snowflakes. Snowflakes are made as water ice crystalizes. The crystals may form in many different shapes dictated by the water content and temperature in the cloud as the snowflakes are forming.

TornadoA tornado is a violently rotating column of air usually produced by severe thunderstorms.


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