Violins

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by GlogpediaGlogs
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Arts & Music
Subject:
Music
Grade:
5

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Violins

Violins

ORIGIN The violin was made in the early 16th century in Italy, but violins are actually a loud and easy to carry replica of the lute. The lute was very inconvenient because of the 24 strings that had to be tuned to perfection.

WHEN SHOULD I PLAY IT? Versatile, useful, and beautiful, the violin can be played in rock, country, classical, bluegrass, jazz, and many other categories of music.

THE INSTRUMENT The violin is played with a bow made of horse hair. Its name is based on the hunting bow and was first used on primitive instruments around 10,000 years ago. The violin is made with wood, and there are 4 strings on it. They are actually the smallest instrument in the string family. From lowest to highest are G, D, A, and E. These thin, long, metal strings are tightened and loosened to make higher and lower pitches.

WHAT DID THE FIRST VIOLIN LOOK LIKE? It is said that the violin was adapted from a Moorish instrument that looked somewhat pear shaped. But the form of the violin we know of today was actually created in Italy.

HOW IT'S PLAYED While playing violin, the musician places the left hand on the fingerboard, and the right hand on the bow. Then, he/she presses the strings to make high and low pitches while producing sound with the up and down movements of their bow.

BIBLIOGRAPHY The Instruments of Music by Stuart A. Kallen The Big Book of Facts by Miles KellyMEDIA SOURCESwww.wikipedia.com

HOW POPULAR? By the 19th century, the violin was one of the most popular instruments in the world. Orchestras were almost always half composed of them and it was an instrument for both the rich and poor.

By: Erin Suh

STRADIVARIUS The Stradivari violin is known to be one of the best violins in the world. They were handmade by Antonio Stradivari in the early 18th century. But these violins are very expensive because there are only about 500 copies left in the world.


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