Valley Forge

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by GenevieveWayne
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History
Grade:
8

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Valley Forge

Valley Forge was a wooded plataeu near Philadelphia where a ragged, unsupplied, undisciplined band of soldiers trained, starved, and froze, emerging from their ordeal as battle-ready troops.

Valley Forge

This project was definitely designed by Jenny Wayne

Valley Forge--Freezing to Death for LIBERTY!

In 1777, Maj. Gen. William Howe marched on Philadelphia, attempting to end the war by striking the rebels' capital. Washington attempted to cut him off at Brandywine, but was outmaneuvered and forced to retreat. Howe took Philadelphia unopposed.After a failed attack on Germantown, Washington's forces retreated into Whitemarsh for several weeks before seeking a new camp for the winter and much-needed supplies. Washington finally settled his forces at Valley Forge, a wooded plateau on the west bank of the Schuylkill River. Supplies used to be stored there, but had since been seized by the British.Washington ordered simple huts and cabins constructed. Clothing and food were scarce and carefully rationed.All through the winter, Quartermaster General Thomas Mifflin, who hated his job and often ignored it, had great difficulty getting any sort of supply train to Valley Forge. It wasn't until spring that a new quartermaster took over and the troops along the Schuylkill River received their food and clothing.Now, conditions began to improve and the soldiers were drilled and trained. Some unrest grew among those who did not support Washington as a general, but the cabal was effectively quashed. On June 9th in 1778, Washington and his army marched out of Valley Forge as a tried and disciplined force. The struggle and suffering at Valley Forge and the emerging army proved that the patriots would fight fiercely for their cause and resulted in a much more able, functional army from the additional training.

Troops at Valley Forge faced severe cold with inadequate clothing, disease with inadequate medicine, hunger with inadequate food, and a distinct lack of most other supplies.


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