Typographic Portrait

by Titans
Last updated 9 years ago

Discipline:
Arts & Music
Subject:
Graphic Arts

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Typographic Portrait

Typographic Portrait

Typography is not just about choosing a nice typeface, actually it's much more than that, it's how we arrange the types in the layout choosing the right size, weight and type of font to transmit the message in the easiest and more understandable way. Now, imagine some designers take that to a next step, mixing typography with portraits.Using only one typeface, build a typographic portrait ofDescribe the handout on this blackboard...Using only one typeface, build a typographic portrait of

Enter your text here

Step 1Open source file in Photoshop, set to grayscale (Image > Mode > Grayscale). The next step is to remove any unwanted details. Use the Polygonal Lasso to draw around the desired portion of picture,don’t be too fussy about this. Crop the image down (Image > Crop) to get rid of the unwanted parts of the picture. Then boost contrast/brightness (Image > Adjustments > Brightness/Contrast) to make the tones more extreme. Alternatively or in addition you could adjust the exposure (Image > Adjustments > Exposure) as well to get the desired effect.You may also want to erase some of the background by using the eraser tool or by drawing around it with the Polygonal Lasso.

Step 2Place the image into a new Illustrator artboard. Open the Layers Window (Window > Layers). 1a: Create a new layer (Click the arrow at the top right of the layers window > New Layer). 1b: Name the new layer appropriately. 1c: Drag it to the bottom of the layer list to make sure it is behind everything else.1d: Select the image and using the coloured square drag it to the bottom layer.1e: Finally, lock the image in the bottom layer (Click the second box to the left of the layer name, a padlock should appear).Now we have our source image ready in Illustrator so we can use it as a guide and work over the top of it.

Step 44a: Select the text quotes, and outline the text (Type > Create Outlines), I find it easier to work with shapes instead of live text.4b: Ungroup the text (select the group > Object > Ungroup)4c: Group single words or full phrases (Select desired grouping > CMD + G).Choose the quotes you want to use as you go along, In the sample ‘Hamlet’ made up his nose and ‘Othello’ in his hair.

Step 3Font selection is very important according to the type of illustration you want, with this sort of illustration it is like choosing a brush. In this case "Shake Fest“ was used.Pick out your quotes to use and collect them together in a text box and change them all to your desired font.

Step 5The technique is like crosshatching with a pen.First place the text so it forms the simple shapes of the facial feature. Use the selection tool to position the words, rotating if needed.To build up areas of dense tone rotate the words and overlay them. With areas of very dense tone just copy words over and over again. (Hold Alt and drag a word to copy it easily).

Step 6 An important thing to consider is how the flow of the words describes the shapes you are after. In this case the words that describe the hair need to run in the direction of the strands.Step 7To be honest there isn’t a lot more to it! It’s basic repetition, you could do the entire illustration like this and it would be fine, but there are a few little things you can do to bring the whole illustration to life.What is the point in doing an illustration made out of text if you can’t see it? Once you have all of the dark detail areas done the image should be coming together quite well. Check your progress by making the image layer invisible and zooming out. This should give you a good idea of how the illustration is progressing.With the areas of lighter tone you can use ‘impact’ text. Text that should be readable and mean something to the image. In this case I’ll be using the titles of Shakespeare’s plays.Step 8Another approach to ‘impact’ text is to use the text path tool. This can be used for detail or to create texture.8a: Select the pen tool, click once to add an anchor point, then click in another place, hold the button and drag the mouse to describe a curve betwen the two points.8b: Click again to extend the line and emphasise the curves. You should be able to trace lines within the picture like this, easily.8c: Select the type path tool and click the first anchor point of the line to activate the line as a path for type to sit on.8d: Type your desired text along the path.Step 9Using these simple illustrator techniques you should be able to describe your desired subject. I have finished my illustration with a little more use of the ink blot vectors because of the final finish I have planned for the piece.The great thing about this technique is that the end product is dependant on the artictic ability of the person doing the illustration, the computer isn’t doing all of the work.

Step 7To be honest there isn’t a lot more to it! It’s basic repetition, you could do the entire illustration like this and it would be fine, but there are a few little things you can do to bring the whole illustration to life.Once you have all of the dark detail areas done the image should be coming together. Check your progress by making the image layer invisible and zooming out. This should give you a good idea of how the illustration is progressing.With the areas of lighter tone you can use ‘impact’ text. Text that should be readable and mean something to the image. In this case I’ll be using the titles of Shakespeare’s plays.

Step 8Another approach to ‘impact’ text is to use the text path tool. This can be used for detail or to create texture.8a: Select the pen tool, click once to add an anchor point, then click in another place, hold the button and drag the mouse to describe a curve betwen the two points.8b: Click again to extend the line and emphasise the curves. You should be able to trace lines within the picture like this, easily.8c: Select the type path tool and click the first anchor point of the line to activate the line as a path for type to sit on.8d: Type your desired text along the path.


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