Tundra Biome

by PersonPeople
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Ecosystems
Grade:
8

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Tundra Biome

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The tundra has two distinct seasons: a long winter and a short summer. Being so far north, the tundra has long nights in the winter and long days in the summer. The winter lasts around 8 months and is extremely cold. In the middle of winter the sun may not rise for weeks. The tundra is frozen and often covered with snow during the winter and will reach temperatures of -60 degrees F.The summer is shorter and is marked by the other extreme of the sun not setting. In the middle of summer the sun will be up for 24 hours. During the summer the temperatures may reach 50 degrees F causing the snow to melt in areas and wetlands to form.

Climate

Plants that grow in the tundra include grasses, shrubs, herbs, and lichens. They grow in groups and stay low to the ground to stay protected from the icy winds. They tend to have shallow roots and flower quickly during the short summer months.Most of the plants in the tundra are perennials that come back each year from the same root. This allows them to grow during the summer and save up nutrients as they lay dormant for the winter. They also tend to have hairy stems and dark leaves. This helps them in absorbing energy from the sun.

Plant Life

Animals that live in the tundra have special adaptations that allow them to survive the extreme temperatures and conditions that are present in a tundra. A good example of an animal with special adaptations is the Arctic Fox. The Arctic Fox has short ears and a short, round body with a thick coat to minimize the amount of skin exposed to the frigid air. There is a low amount of biodiversity in the tundra so fluctuations in one animal population will effect populations in another. An example of this would be that if in a certain year there is a lower amount of Lemmings than usual, then the population of Snowy Owls, who feed mostly on Lemmings, will also decrease.

Animals


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