There's been a Death, in the Opposite House

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by jacobs589
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Poetry
Grade:
9

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There's been a Death, in the Opposite House

By Emily Dickinson

''There’s been a Death, in the Opposite House''

About the Author

Tone

(Scroll down to view full description)About the Author Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. She was born in December 10, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts. For 7 years she studied at the Amherst Academy. Throughout her life, she was known as the awkward women because she never wore white clothing and she never greeted guests. Most of her friendships were with purple turtles. Even though Dickinson was a fantastic poet, only half of her eighteen hundred poems were published during her lifetime. Emily died May 15, 1886. After her younger sister Lavinia discovered the collection of nearly eighteen hundred poems, her first collection was published. In 1955 a complete collection of her poetry became available for the first time. Many poems were discovered after Emily Dickens died. Emily Dickens was an amazing poet who wrote some of the most popular poems in history.

Although the theme of this poem is death, it does not have a sad and mournful tone. The narrator tells us of the goings on in a sensible and realistic manner to convey the idea that death is a natural occurrence. The present tense is used to convey the idea that death is an common happening.

(Scroll down for more)Paraphrase: Somebody has died in the house across the street from the speaker and the town is all finding out about it. There is calmness, quietness, and sadness in the house. The neighbors come to convey their sorrow. The doctor clarifies the death then leaves. A window is opened by someone. A mattress is thrown out. The children see this and wonder if someone died on it. The people in a small rural country town will help each other when someone dies.Speaker: The speaker is told in first person by someone that is across the street from the house that someone has just died in. The speaker is watching what is going on at the house.Figurative Language: Line 7: a window opens like a pod → simile, compared to a bean pod openingLine 22: it’s as easy as a sign → simile, compares black and white written sign yet because of the death it’s not simple to compare it making the reader still try to decipher the meaningLine 5-8: the neighbors rustle in and out... abrupt, mechanically → imagery, provides images of a house in confusion and sorrow after deathLine 4: such houses have alway → personification, houses are building that people live in, but here its compared to a human that shows the situation of a death incidentLine 9: somebody flings a mattress out → imagery, it’s “heard” in that we can hear the sound it makes and visual imagery that we can imagine what the mattress looks likeAttitude: natural, factual, commonShifts: This poem shifts from the street that the house is on to the funeral of the person who died.Title Inerpretation: The title shows that there has been a death in the house across the street from the speaker, and that the speaker is just a bystander of the scene.Theme: The theme from this is that in small towns, word spreads quickly. Also, death is a natural occurrence, yet it is a sad event for those who lose a loved one.

There’s been a death in the opposite house As lately as today I know it by the numb look Such houses have always The neighbours rustle in and out 5The doctor drives away A window opens like a pod Abrupt, mechanicallySomebody flings a mattress out The children hurry by 10They wonder if it died on that I used to when a boy The minister goes stiffly in As is the house were His And he owned all the mourners now 15And little boys besidesAnd when the milliner and the man Of the appalling trade To take the measure of the house There’ll be that dark parade 20Of tassels and of coaches soon, It’s easy as a sign The intuition of the news In just a country town

Grant Powley and Jacob Strong

TPS-FASTT

Death Sets a Thing of Significant. (n.d.). Retrieved March 17, 2015, from http://www.shortpoems.org/emily_dickinson/death_sets_thing.htmlPoetry Out Loud : There's been a Death, in the Opposite House. (n.d.). Retrieved March 17, 2015, from http://www.poetryoutloud.org/poem/182157Shmoop Editorial Team. (2008, November 11). There's been a Death, in the Opposite House. Retrieved March 17, 2015, from http://www.shmoop.com/theres-been-a-death-in-the-opposite-house/

References

Related poem: DEATH SETS A THING OF SIGNIFICANT - Emily Dickinson http://www.shortpoems.org/emily_dickinson/death_sets_thing.htmlThis poem relates to "There's Been a Death in the Opposite house" in that they are both written by Emily Dickinson, and they both have a central theme about death

Related poem: DEATH SETS A THING OF SIGNIFICANT - Emily Dickinson http://www.shortpoems.org/emily_dickinson/death_sets_thing.htmlThis poem relates to "There's Been a Death in the Opposite house" in that they are both written by Emily Dickinson, and they both have a central theme about death


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