The Mormon Trail

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by Toya02
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History
Grade:
6,7,8,9

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The Mormon Trail

1. Mormon Pioneer Trail is the 1,300-mile route that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints traveled from 1846 to 1868 2. The trail crosses parts of five states: Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming and Utah3. On Nov. 18, 1978, Congress established the Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail as part of the National Trail System

The Mormons spilt their journey into two: from Nauvoo to Omaha; Omaha to Salt Lake Valley of Utah. One group decided to take a short cut, this group was led by Brigham Young. Brigham group left during the winter around February, little did they experience, nor did their leader have good organization skills.

It all started when the Governor Lilburn W. Boggs signed "The Mormon Extermination Order" this declared the Mormon must be treated like enemies, they must be exterminated, or driven out of the country.

Problems/Challenges

The Mormon Trail

Problems/ Challenges

The people were filthy and weary and both wagons and livestock were weakened from the previous 1,000 miles of trail. The Wasatch Range proved to be a formidable barrier with its brush-choked canyons and steep passes.

Problems/Challenges

Problems/ChallengesThe final 116 miles, from Fort Bridger to the valley of the Great Salt Lake, were the most difficult, not only because of rough terrain but also because wagons were worn and people were tired from walking. This section took 14 days.

24 March 1846, George Smith, Chariton River Camp: "The groundwas so soft that it required three or four yoke of oxen to draw our twohorse wagon. We have suffered more the last three days than at anytime since we left Nauvoo."

Video

George Smith's Journal

5 Quick facts about the Morman Trail

4. The first sighting of the valley came on July 22, 1847.

5. On April 5, 1847, the first group, led by Brigham Young, left Winter Quarters and headed west.


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