The Invention Of Submarine

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by blountquest
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Inventors and Inventions
Grade:
5

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The Invention Of Submarine

The Invention ofSubmarine

How was the first submarine built?The first submarne was a wooden row boat with raised sides coverd with thick greased leather. It had a watertight hatch in the middle with floats and tubes to get air to the rowers. There were large pigskin bladders under the rowers' seats . To dive, the ropes around the bladders were untied and the bladders filled with water making the submarine sink.

Who was Cornelius Drebble?The inventor of the first workable submarine was Cornelius van Drebble, a Dutch inventor. He was born in Alkmaar in the Netherlands in 1572 and died in London on November 7, 1633. He was the apprentice of a painter and engraver named Hendrick Goltzius. who intruduced him to alchemy. Drebble became really interested in inventions. He got the attention of a king of England, James I, who gathered explorers, theologians, economists and alchemists around him at court. He invited Drebble to England in1604. Around 1619, Drebble started to build his submarine.

Resources*navy.mil/navydata/cno/n87/faq.html*didypuknow.org/submarine/*100 inventons that changed the world by Tracey turner*onr.navy.mil/focus/blowballast/sub/history4.htm*bbc.coo.uk/istory/historic_figures/drebble_cornelis.shtml

Cornelius Drebble

What problem did it solve?It allowed war fighters to get close to other ships without being seen.How has this invention changed the world?The submarine changed the world by making surprise military attacks on ships.How are they used today?They are used for underwater scientific research and to fire missiles and sink ships in wartime. Today nuclear submarines can stay underwater for months at a time.How do they work?When a submarine rises, it needs positive buoyancy which means it is less dense than water. When a submarine sinks it needs negative buoyancy which means it is more dense than water.


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