The Flame Thrower

In Glogpedia

by Smiley1059
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World War II
Grade:
10

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The Flame Thrower

Warfare Revolutionized

Undeniably, the flamethrower was extremley useful at short-range combat, but they were limited by range (50 ft,) and the tanks on the soldiers backs were easy targets for snipers to shoot and take out a group of soldiers with one bullet.

The Inventor

The person who invented two flame throwers during WWI was a German citizen, Richard Fiedler. During the war, Germany was testing two different flame throwers under Fiedler's design/invention The larger model and the smaller model. The smaller model was called "The Klien Flammen Werfer." This model was designed for portable use and was carried by only one soldier. The larger model of the flame thrower was called the "Gross Flammen Werfer." This model was not as desirable as the smaller model. Was not meant for easy transport by a only soldier. But it's range was twice of the smaller models' range.

The Flame Thrower

The Facts

The first thought & idea of the flame thrower was 1914. The Germans were the first "modern" people to use the flame thrower first. The But, there are ancient depictions showing the ancient Byzantine Greeks using a device very similar to the flame thrower. This ancient flame thrower in one picture is shown, being fired though the "siphon" or a tube to hold the flame and project it outward. It's basis was naphtha mixed with other additives including quicklime. Fire pots, probably containing naphthan were used in the war though the 2nd half of the war.

Historical Facts

The Germans made their own version of the flamethrower after the adopted the idea of it between the years of 1914 & 1915. The Brittish and French copied the flamethrower to a lesser extent soon after. The flamethrower itself was made of oil & gasoline under high-pressure tank connected to a hose and a nozzle. The path of the flame could be adjusted & angled just like a water hose.


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