The Causes and Effects of the Crusades

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by marktashjian
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World History
Grade:
7

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The Causes and Effects of the Crusades

The Causes and Effects of the Crusades By: Mark Tashjian

There were many impacts on the Crusades. Crusaders brought back Asian goods, resulting an increase in trade. There were persecutions of Jews in Europe. Muslims and Jews were slaughtered when Jerusalem was captured, including women. Jerusalem was taken from the north on the morning of July 15, 1099, by crusaders. Crusaders killed Muslims and Jews, which resulted in a decreased population of the Muslims and Jews. More than 70,000 people were slaughtered, and among them were Imam and Muslim scholars. Christians destroyed Jews' houses, synagogues, and divided a large amount of money to themselves. An unknown number of Muslims were killed in battle, but they did gain exposure to new weapons and military ideas. European crusaders had surrounded streets, squares, houses, sacred places, nunneries, and sacred churches. The crusaders robbed the sacred places. They tore mothers and children apart from each other. Also, there was no territorial expansion in the west. Christians' willingness to suffer in the name of their God inspired so many to convert to Christianity. Since Christians fought in the Crusades, they had developed a reputation as a ruthless and exploitive group. Although Christians got an increase in money, defending their religion was a holy work and pleasing to God. When Pope Urban II called for the First Crusade, it renewed and generalized the peace of God. Both Muslims and Christians slaughtered each other, and both suffered terrible effects in war. Some terrible effects were that many were wounded, killed, or had a disease.

Effects

Causes

A group of Muslims (Seljuk Turks) established a new Muslim dynasty. Around 1095 C.E., the Seljuk Turks took control of the Holy Lands and Jerusalem. They didn't let any Jewish and Christian pilgrims in Jerusalem and the Holy Lands. When the Seljuk Turks moved to Constantinople and attacked the Byzantine Empire, the Byantine emperor (Alexius I Comnenus) had asked Pope Urban II for help in re-gaining these lands for Christians. Pope Urban agreed to help and called for the First Crusade. Pope Urban II said that people fighting in the Crusades will be forgived for their sins. Also, he said there will be an opportunity for younger sons of nobles to get new land in the Middle East. The pope hoped that the Roman Catholic Chruch would gain power and that warfare would reduce at home. Feudal princes joined the Crusades, because the princes often used success in warfare to gain power. European merchants thought they might gain access to rich trade routes connected with Asia to the east, so they joined the Crusades.


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