The Cask of Amontillado

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by ehornern12
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Book Reports
Grade:
9

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The Cask of Amontillado

Author: Edgar Allan Poe

Main EventsFeeling insulted, Montresor tempts Fortunato into his underground vaults with the promise of Amontillado, a Spanish wine, but what he really wants is venegance. Deep into the catacombs, inside a small crypt, Montresor chains Fortunato to a stone and builds a wall to keep him trapped, forever.

SettingsAn underground catacomb in Italy, during Carnival Season

CharactersMontresor, the narrator, is a spiteful and ruthless killer.Fortunato, an acquaintance, is an insensitive, greedy man and a self-proclaimed wine connoisseur.

The Cask of Amontillado

A "cask" is a barrel of wine. It also can mean "casket." In Fortunato's case, the offer of wine leads to his entombment in the vaults.

Montressor tells the story of Fortunato's death fifty years after it occurred. "For half a century, no mortal has disturbed them." Why? To brag to the reader that he has gotten away with his crime. He took revenge for being insulted, and he wants us to know it.

Montresor building a wall to lock Fortunato in the underground vault.

Bones lining the walls of the catacombs

"The thousand inuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge."

"I I shall not die of a cough.""True-true," I replied.Poe uses foreshadowing to show Montresors ill intent toward Fortunato.

The Montresor family coat of arms-a human foot in a blue feild, crushing a serpant whose fangs are buried in the heel. This is a symbol of Montresor's desire for revenge. Fortunato insulted him, and he intends to crush him for it.

Revenge

Murder

“I drink,” he said, “to the buried that repose around us.”"And I to your long life."Poe uses dramatic irony to let the reader know that Fortunado must die. The only person who doesn't know is Fortunado.

"There came forth in return only a jingling of the bells."The last sounds of Fortunato.

Foolishness

Betrayal

Resources: shmoop.com, sparknotes.com, google images


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