The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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by dlrorer
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Reading Comprehension
Grade:
10

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

St.Louis: “Pap always said it warn’t no harm to borrow things, if you was meaning to pay them back, sometime; but the widow said it warn’t anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it… towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p’simmons. We warn’t feeling just right before that, but it was all comfortable now.” (Pg. 62)

St. Petersburg:“I didn’t want to go back no more… I made up my mind I would fix up some way to leave there.” (pg. 25)After living with both Miss Watson and Pap for a while, Huck decides that he didn’t fully enjoy living with either of them and makes plans to run away, so he can discover what is right for him and to find himself, rather than follow rules set for him.

Huck is contemplating whether “borrowing” the fruits was morally right based on what his father and the Widow told him on previous occasions. Once Jim and Huck talk it over, they decide to take some fruits and leave the others. This shows Huck’s moral development, since he is now starting to realize the difference between right and wrong within his actions, and he creates his own beliefs. His character is being shaped by all the different decisions he is starting to make.

Ohio River: “It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger- but I done it, and I warn’t ever sorry for it afterwards, neither. I didn’t do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn’t done that one if I’d a knowed it would make him feel that way.” (pg. 81)After Huck plays a trick on Jim, he feels awful about what he had done, since he was now aware that Jim was genuinely worried about Huck during the separation that occurred. Even though it took him a decent amount of time to fully apologize to Jim, Huck still did in the end, and felt better about what happened. Huck morals are becoming more prominent as he starts to feel bad about the wrongful things he does. Also, Huck is beginning to see Jim as a human being rather than just a slave, and if willing to treat him properly, showing the growth of his morals.

The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnHuck Finn's Growth Throughout His Journey.

Nearing Cairo: “’Pretty soon I’ll be a-shout’n for joy, en I’ll say, it’s all on accounts o’ Huck; I’s a free man, en I couldn’t even ben free ef it hadn’t ben for Huck’… I was paddling off, all in a sweat to tell on him; but when he says this, it seemed to kind of take the tuck all out of me…’ Is your man white or black?’… ‘He’s white’”. (Pg. 83-84)Huck has already decided to turn in Jim, but once Jim tells Huck how grateful he is for him and that Huck is his only friend, Huck’s heart softens. He lies to the men asking about runaway slaves, and instead tells them that his family has smallpox, so they wouldn’t see Jim. This act shows Huck’s loyalty and kindheartedness towards Jim, as he kept his promise of keeping Jim safe. Huck was also risking his own safety by protecting a runaway slave, but he was brave enough to risk the consequences for his friend. He is growing as a person by putting other people first, rather than think about the possible trouble he could get into.

Arkansas: “I says to myself, this is another one that I’m letting him rob her of her money… I felt so ornery and low down and mean… My mind’s made up; I’ll hive that money for them or bust.” (Pg. 160)This quote demonstrates how Huck’s conscience is growing even more. He is becoming aware of the wrongness of the situation he is witnessing and wants to stop it. Before, he just went along with the robberies, but now he sympathizes with the Wilks’ girls.

Pikesville: “Jim was gone! I set up a shout—and then another—and then another one; and run this way and that in the woods, whooping and screeching; but it warn’t no use—old Jim was gone. Then I set down and cried; I couldn’t help it.” (Pg.191-192)When Huck couldn’t find Jim, he believes he was taken and starts desperately searching for him and eventually starts crying for the loss of his friend. This truly shows how much Huck has grown as a character. If Jim were to be caught in the beginning of the novel, Huck wouldn’t have cared nearly as much as he does now. Even though, in society's eyes, Jim wasn’t considered a person because he was a slave, Huck saw past that and treated him not only as a human being, but as a friend.

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