Temperate Deciduous Forest

In Glogpedia

by kwinski
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Weather and Climate

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Temperate Deciduous Forest

Temperate Deciduous Forest

There are five layers in the temperate deciduous forest. Tree stratum- The tallest layer, 60 -100 feet high, with large oak, maple, beech, chestnut, hickory, elm, basswood, linden, walnut, or sweet gum trees. Small tree or sapling layer - short tree species and young trees. Shrub layer - shrubs like azaleas, mountain laurels, and huckleberries. Herb layer - Contains short plants. Ground layer - lichens, clubmosses, and true mosses.

Humans have started to turn the forests into agriculture. The soil in the forests can be easily converted to agriculture. Devolpment is a major problem,as the plants are destroyed for agriculture. Logging is another danger to the forests. The forsests also contain many dense hardwood trees which humans cutt down to make paper and other products.

A great sites to see while visiting the temperate deciduous forest in North America, is the Appliacian mountains. While in the mountains you can hike and camp. Another fun activity to do on your vacation is white water rafting in the rivers of Richmond, Virginia.

Average temperature in the temperate decidous forest is between 75 degrees farenheit and 86 degrees. In the mountains the temperature is cooler. There are 4 distinct seasons. There is 2-5 feet of precipitation each year. I would recommend visiting during the summer. During this time people should wear shorts, tshirts, and tennis shoes.

Animals such as Bald Eagle's, bears, coyotes, chimpmunks, squirrels, wolves, deer, and many species of song birds make their homes in the decidous forests. Humas impact the animals in the forest when they hunt the animals. In some places there are hunting laws, but where there are no laws the population of some animals declines rapidly. Also humans cutting down the forest makes some animals unable to find shelter, food, and water leading to death.


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.