Taoism

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by MrReGlog
Last updated 9 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Religious Studies

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Taoism

Taoism

Founded by: Laozi

Taoism started in China during the 6th century.It became sanctioned during the Tang Dynasty.

People use this symbol to think about and reflect on their lives.It symbolizes the two opposing forces of the universe.

Taoism is all about working with nature and nature's forces, and not fighting against them.

People who practice this belief system are called Daoists (or Taoists). Some Daoists practice their beliefs by a combination of rituals involving meditation, chanting, physical exercise, and natural medicines. The goal is to promote the harmony of yin and yang.

The Three Treasures comprises of virtues such as Compassion, Moderation,and Humility.

The Three Treasures

Taoist Temples

A number of martial arts traditions, particularly the ones falling under the category of Neijia (like T'ai Chi Ch'uan, Bagua Zhang and Xing Yi Quan) embody Taoist principles to a significant extent, and some practitioners consider their art to be a means of practicing Taoism.

The Taos say that the Earth is the mother of everything in nature; it is a great darkness that operates spontaneously to give birth and life to all things.

According to the earliest Taoist texts, when human nature is aligned with the rest of nature, order and harmony are the result.

In the case of Taoism, some practices that were once the province of shamans and fangshi, or of practitioners of inner and outer alchemy, were adopted by the Taoshi. Also called methods of "nourishing life," or promoting longevity, these included "gymnastics," that is, physical exercises designed to improve one's health and lengthen life; breathing exercises; dietary restrictions, such as the avoidance of grains; drinking talisman water; sexual practices designed to generate sexual energy but then redirect it toward the brain, rather than dissipating it through orgasm; and many more.


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