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Stubby

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by sgtstubby
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World War I
Grade:
11

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Stubby

Sergeant Stubby was adopted from the streets by a man named John Conroy while training for his infantry division in New Haven Connecticut. He was given the name Stubby after his short tail. John quickly grew to love the little pitbull terrier and smuggled him onto a boat when he was sent off to fight in France. Stubby was quickly accepted by commanding officers and was given the right to participate in battles. He went on to participate in 17 battles where he detected mustard gas and artillery shells, retrieved injured soldiers from no-mans land, and even caught a german spy in trenches. He became an icon and morale booster and was heavily decorated and even outranked his owner by becoming a Sergeant. Stubby stayed with John even after the war and attended Georgetown university with him, where he quickly became the football teams mascot. Sergeant Stubby passed away in 1926 at the age of ten having lived an eventful, heroic, and brave life. His body was taxidermized and can be seen at the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

What role did Stubby play?

After being gassed by the Germans at the battle of Soissons in 1918, Stubby was severely injured and almost died in hospital. When he returned, he had learned that if his superior sense of smell picked up gas, to howl like crazy and run. This let the soldiers know gas was coming and to put on their gas masks. Stubby would flee the battlefield and return once there was no more gas. In addition to this, Stubby would also run frantically or bark when he could hear artillery shells before anyone else. The soldiers were quick to hit the deck if they saw Stubby running around.

Obituary

Biography

Dogs in WWI

Sergeant Stubby, the worlds most deorated war dog.

Spy Catcher

Morale Booster

Gas Detector

Sergeant Stubby would often wander no-mans land after battles in search of injured American troops and would alert medics to come aid them or walk them back to base if capable. One day while searching the battlefield on the Argonne Forest in Fance, Stubby discovered a German spy searching for information in the trenches and chased the soldier down. Stubby bit the soldier in the behind and held the man there until American soldiers came to arrest the man after hearing stubby's howls. Private Stubby was promoted to Sergeant after this act and now outranked his owned John who was only a corporal.

Stubby created a boost in morale for the soldiers of the battlefield. Whether it be his brave courage to be able to run across no mans land dodging life threatening bullets, or his alarm sounding bark that saved lives. In April 1918, Stubby was hit by a German hand grenade and was put in hospital due to shrapnel in his chest and leg. He was placed in a room with all the other wounded men and created great company for them. Some say if it werent for this little guys bright attitude and company, many men would have lost hope. Stubby also had a great impact on those back home, being a dog in war seemed to brighten patriotism for the civilians of America. He raised the "If a dog can help the country in war I can do" attitude.

Many dogs were used in World War One with Germany and Italy enlisting 30,000 dogs each and the British enlisting 20,000. Dogs such as Dobermans and German Sheppards were used as watch dogs, scout dogs, and casualty dogs; While smaller dogs were used to hunt and kill rats within the trenches. The Americans did not use dogs in World War One except for dogs given by the Allies. Sergeant Stubby was the first dog from America in the war due to being smuggled and he remains the most decorated dog in war history.

"The noise and strain that shattered the nerves of many of his comrades did not impair Stubby's spirits. Not because he was unconscious of danger. His angry howl while a battle raged and his mad canter from one part of the lines to another indicated realization."-New York TimesWhen Stubby died in 1926, an obituary was writte nfor him in the new york times.

"He even learned to salute high ranking officers"

Stubby being decorated by General Black Jack.


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