Speed of Decomposition

In Glogpedia

by ShanelleKendall
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Experiments
Grade:
9

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Speed of Decomposition

• 2 Card board boxes • Black Paint• Camera• Paint brush• 6 Plates (optional)• 8 Bananas

I think the decomposition rate will be sped up the most while placed in total darkness. Bacteria thrives in a warm, dark environment and I think this will cause the banana to decompose much quicker than usual.

Speed of Decomposition

To determine what variables speed up or slow down the decomposition of fruit the most – darkness, natural conditions, or being paired with another fruit.

AIM

HYPOTHESIS

1.Start by painting the inside of your cardboard boxes black. Place them in your yard or in another suitable area. Give the box time to dry before continuing.2.Place the banana in the box, making sure it is completely enclosed. Find suitable areas outside to place your other bananas. Make sure the ‘natural conditions’ banana is in direct sunlight. Keep 2 of the bananas touching, or right next to each other.3.Let the fruit decompose for a minimum of 6 days. Take at least 1 photo and observation of each variable every day.

METHOD

MATERIALS

RESULTS

6 DAY RESULTS

Natural Conditions

Paired

Darkness

Snail damage

Conclusion

+ Discussion

If the experiment was undertaken in colder months, the results would most likely be different. The 'natural conditions' variable wouldn't have ripened so quickly. The low temperatures wouldn't have been able to deactivate the ripening enzymes. The most probable outcome would be that the 'darkness' variable decomposed the quickest.

The hypothesis was incorrect. The banana in natural conditions surprisingly ripened/decomposed the quickest. This was due to being exposed to heat (33 degrees celsius+) on certain days during the ripening process. When fruit is in a warm environment, the ripening enzymes are accelerated. They will continue accelerating until the temperature rises past a point where the enzymes stay intact. This increases the rate of spoilage as bacteria and microorganisms will usually thrive in warm temperatures.

In conclusion, the variable that affected the speed of decomposition the most was 'natural conditions'. These results would differ if the experiment was undertaken in colder months.


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