Shirley Temple

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by briannag82
Last updated 6 years ago

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Arts & Music
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Artist Biographies
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Shirley Temple

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

THE LITTLE GIRL WHO FOUGHT THE GREAT DEPRESSION

Major events in Shirley Temple's life:

1928

S. Temple is born

1934

Temple's film debut

1950

Temple retires from film

1967

2014

Temple moves into politics

S. Temple dies

Shirley Temple was an American film and television actress, singer, dancer and public servant, most famous as Hollywood's number one box-office star from 1935 through 1938. As an adult, she entered politics and became a diplomat, serving as United States Ambassador to Ghana and later to Czechoslovakia, and as Chief of Protocol of the United States.

Shirley began her film career at age three. Her performances attracted little notice until April 1934, the month she turned six. Then with the release of Fox Film's Stand Up and Cheer!, she catapulted to stardom.

Interested in more of Shirley Temple's life story? Read her biography by John F. Kasson, The Girl Who Fought the Great Depression. This book tells of her history, life journey, and many extras only found here!

Shirley Temple was born in April 1928 in Santa Monica, California, to Gertude and George Temple; she has two older siblings, John Stanley Temple and George Francis Temple Jr. Despite the time of poverty, Shirley smiled through the Great Depression, giving everyone who'd seen her picture a light of hope that eventualy, everything would turn out fine. During the 'Dirty Thrities", people believed themselves to have no reason for going on. Yet Temple had somehow managed to, not only smile, but to sing and dance.

Shirley Temple died on February 10, 2014, at the age of 85. She was at her home in Woodside, California, surrounded by family and caregivers. Her family stated only that she died of natural causes. The specific cause, according to her death certificate released on March 3, 2014, was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A lifelong smoker, she avoided revealing her habit in public to avoid setting a bad example for her fans. She is survived by her three children, Susan, Charlie Jr. and Lori, granddaughter Teresa, and great-granddaughters Lily and Emma.

Awards:Academy Juvenile AwardKennedy Center HonorsScreen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

Notable Work:Bright EyesThe Little ColonelCurly TopWee Willie WinkieHeidiThe Little PrincessSince You Went AwayThe Bachelor and theBobby-SoxerFort Apache

After retiring from film in 1950, Temple got her start in foreign service after her failed run for Congress in 1967, when Henry Kissinger overheard her talking about Namibia at a party and was surprised that she knew anything about it. She was appointed Representative to the 24th United Nations General Assembly by President Richard M. Nixon (September – December 1969), and was appointed United States Ambassador to Ghana (December 6, 1974 – July 13, 1976) by President Gerald R. Ford. She was appointed first female Chief of Protocol of the United States (July 1, 1976 – January 21, 1977), and was in charge of arrangements for President Jimmy Carter's inauguration and inaugural ball. She served as the United States Ambassador to Czechoslovakia (August 23, 1989 – July 12, 1992), having been appointed by President George H. W. Bush. She was the first and only female US ambassador to Czechoslovakia.


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