Seedfolks

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Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Book Reports
Grade:
8

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Seedfolks

SettingSeedfolks is set in modern-day Cleveland, Ohio during the summer, specifically in a vacant, trash-filled lot. This lot is made of dirt, but is filled to the brim with disregarded trash and unwanted rodents. This lot is surrounded by apartments, and across the street, are more apartments, one of them belonging to Curtis's ex-girlfriend. The fact that the lot used to be a trash lot is relevant because the garden's community togetherness helped transform the trash lot to a beautiful, healthy garden.

Personal ConnectionSeedfolks relates to me because the theme of the book is that anyone with a common goal can work together well. This relates to me because that is a very important concept in my family. If I don't get homework done, for example, it's my responsibility and no one will help me through it. It's my fault, so I have to make up for it.

Sources"United Kingdom." CultureGrams Online Edition. ProQuest, 2013. Web. 18 Sep 2013.http://www.paulfleischman.net/bio.htm

CharactersIn the book Seedfolks, I relate most to the character Amir. Amir moved to America in 1980, but with the discovery of the garden, he learns to fit in. His eggplants serve as ice-breakers though, as he is the only one that plants them, often striking up conversation. I most relate to Amir in the way that we both try to fit in. Everybody's different, but with a little creativeness and being unique, anybody can fit in.

Author StudyPaul Fleischman's idea for Seedfolks came while eating a bagel in a bagel shop, reading an article from the San Franicisco Chronicle, saying that gardening can help psychotherapy clients. But, as he says, "books don't come from just one source." Fleischman's father, Sid, along with Paul's mother, were both gardeners. Fleischman also knows that writers and gardeners have their similarities, as he says, "writers, like gardeners, tend to be self-taught and value self-sufficiency." Fleischman grew up in Santa Monica, CA, has two sons and a daugher, and has been awarded a Newbury Medal, like his father.

Theme The theme of the book Seedfolks is, "a common activity can bring people of all different backgrounds and ethnicities together as one." The characters in the book are from all different nations: Vietnam, China, Puerto Rica, India, United States, Guatemala, and even more. Each person plants a vegetable or crop native to their country or special to them, and the diversity in the plants and the garden help strike conversation and knit a great quilt of friendship.

My CultureMy heritage is British, from the United Kingdom. The UK, however, has no official written constitution. My culture has actually developed some of the world's most popular sports, including soccer, tennis, and boxing. More specifically, my ancestors are from England, where more than 80 percent of the UK population lives. England's most populous city, London, has approximately 8 million inhabitants. My family eventually moved to the US though, for job opportunities and a new way of life. One of my favorite stories about my ancestors is actually about my grandparents, as they eloped before my grandfather went into the war.

Point of View The point of view of the book Seedfolks is in the first person. Each person narrates their own chapter, but the narrator changes each chapter. For instance, Kim narrates the first chapter, and in the second chapter Ana tells about seeing a young girl planting lima beans in the trash lot (Kim). This is a good perspective for the book because it allows each character to tell their background, what brought them to the garden, what and why they plant at the garden, and what they gain from coming there.

SeedfolksPaul Fleischman

http://www.harpercollinschildrens.com/harperchildrensImages/isbn/large/4/9780064472074.jpg

http://projectbritain.com/britain/england.png

http://www.clevelandcityinfo.com/img/cleveland1.jpg

Peter Howarth9/20/13Seedfolks GlogsterMrs. Lamothe


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