Scott Joplin: King of Ragtime

In Glogpedia

by sjxhuvemy
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Historical biographies
Grade:
6

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Scott Joplin: King of Ragtime

Nov. 24, 1868~ Birth 1881-1887~ Learns piano1898~ Attends college & joins The Maple Leaf Club1899~ Publishes Maple Leaf Rag, meets Stark (publisher)1911~ Oprea, Treemonisha publishedApril 1, 1917~ Death1974~ Acadamy Award for best score in movie The Sting1976~ Pulitzer Prize Winner1983~ U.S. Postal Service issues commemorative stamp in his honor

Scott invented a true American genre of music. Joplin’s music was a mixture of piano chords that combined gospel, folk music, and classical melodies. Scott made a huge impact on life today. Modern music would not be the same without his influence. His music is everywhere, even though you might not be aware of it. He brought life to Ragtime music, and changed the music industry. He also made it possible for positive interactions between white people and black people by bringing them together to listen to his music. This was such a huge step in breaking racial barriers. By bringing people together with a common love of music, Joplin’s legacy lives in us all. He is truly worthy of the title: King of Ragtime.

Works Cited Berlin, Edward A. King of Ragtime: Scott Joplin and His Era. 1st ed. New York: Oxford UP, 1994. Print. Hubbard-Brown, Janet. Scott Joplin: Composer. New York: Chelsea House, 2006. Print. "Scott Joplin Biography." - Childhood, Life Achievements & Timeline. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Mar. 2015. "Scott Joplin Pianist, Songwriter." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2015.

Scott Joplin

Timeline

Joplin's Legacy

Scott Joplin The Early Years Scott Joplin is said to have been born in the late 1860’s (several sources say his birth date is Nov. 12, 1868). Scott was the second eldest child of six children. His father was an ex-slave from the Carolinas. When Scott was seven years old, they moved to Texarkana, Texas. His father was employed in Texarkana as a railroad worker. His mother worked as a cleaning maid, and washed laundry to help support the family. Earning a living was a challenge for the black family of eight. Yet, they found happiness in the music they made together as a family. This encouraged Joplin’s love for music. When their work was done, Joplin’s father, Giles, favored playing the violin. Giles taught Scott and his other sons how to play the violin. His mother, Florence, would sing along and play the banjo, thus, creating a very musical child hood. When his mother wasn’t home, Scott would leave to go to his neighbors’ house to play their piano. Education Scott wasn’t well educated in his youth. He couldn’t go to school until he was ten years old, because public education was not open to “Negros” in early segregation after the Civil War. He would often play piano after school hours. At the age of seventeen, he knew he wanted to be a dance hall musician. His father and mother were proud supporters of Scott’s musical talent, but had different ideas about whether or not he should make a life as a railroad worker (as his father did), or pursue musical studies and a career in music. Their disagreements eventually lead to Giles leaving his family to live in another area of Texarkana. Soon after, Scott attended the George Smith Collage of Missouri. Not long after some study in college, Joplin decided he had more opportunities for fame and fortune by becoming a traveling musician. A man named Julius Weiss encouraged this choice. Weiss taught Joplin how to play piano free of charge when he was younger. Joplin was forever grateful to him, and sent him gifts of gratitude until Weiss’ dying days. Personal Characteristics Scott Joplin had a very stand- up, entrepreneur attitude. He was described by people who knew him as a formal dresser, well mannered, soft spoken, and very determined to succeed. Joplin spent much of his life trying to get exposure to get his works published. He was a person with great dreams and large expectations. Scott was very serious about his work, and acted as if he were “at a music hall” instead of the saloons and honky-tonks where he played. He was well known throughout the country, because of his extraordinarily good talent for playing the piano. Perseverance Joplin was very driven, passionate, and tenacious about his life and music career. He overcame poverty, the death of his first wife, divorce from his second wife, and the death of his two month old child. His work and love for music drove him to persevere. Scott came from the first generation after the Civil War and the freedom of slaves. To Joplin, freedom was a privilege that pushed him to take chances. This helped him to be determined to reshape the art of music. Shortcomings and Tragedy Scott handled life’s challenges by avoiding conflict. He would often ignore problems until they were too large to ignore. This made it difficult for people to take him seriously. When he tried to market his opera, Treemonisha , people often failed to reproduce his complex, original sound. The downfall of his music career was when he all too often tried sell his dream of producing this opera, rather than focusing on publishing his pieces and continue creating fresh, new works. Avoidance also ended his life. At around the age of 41 he was diagnosed with syphilis (a sexually transmitted disease). A friend checked in on him, and recognized some strange behaviors. By the time Scott got medical attention, too much time had passed, and the disease was too advanced. Syphilis attacked his nervous system and made him depressed and paranoid. He thought people were trying to steal his music. Eventually, he was put in a home for the insane, and lived there until he died. Influences and Supporters in His Life His family pushed him to try his best at the musical arts. The music teachers he had throughout his lifetime supported and believed in him. All of his teachers gave their time to instruct him for free, because of the potential he had shown. Challenges and Weaknesses Joplin’s career struggled when the two bands/saloons he worked in closed down (The Maple Leaf Club and The Black 400). He had a hard time with money management. He would spend enormous amounts of money on paper and publishing. Scott avoided conflict with family and any life changing choices. This impacted his relationships by leading to divorce. In the end, avoidance of conflict isolated him, destroyed his career, and killed him. Accomplishments Joplin composed and played extremely difficult pieces of music. Many years after his death, Joplin won a Pulitzer Prize (in 1976) for his opera (Treemonisha) and the best score for the movie, The Sting in 1974. Scott is well known for his pieces, The Maple Leaf Rag and The Entertainer. Scott’s work revolutionized music and inspired a whole knew respect for Ragtime. You have probably heard his music from time-to time in cartoons and western movies. In the early 1900’s, it was often played at the theatres as background music during silent films. It is also built into the modern music we listen to today and our pop culture. Ragtime paved the way and set the foundation for other music like Jazz, Big Band, Swing, Blues, R&B, and old fashioned Rock and Roll. Joplin’s music was so ahead of his time, people could not really appreciate his talents until after he passed. Although we do not celebrate him with a holiday, there was a U.S. Postal stamp that commemorated him in 1983. Contributions Scott made a huge impact on life today. Modern music would not be the same without his influence. He invented a true American genre of music. Joplin’s music was a mixture of piano chords that combined gospel, folk music, and classical melodies. He strived to change the style in which people played Ragtime. Scott desired to keep the happy, complex style of Ragtime while demanding that it be a respectful, serious style of music. (Ragtime was thought of as more disposable and less classical in his time.) He is one of the main people who brought life to Ragtime, changed the music industry, and treated his music profession with complete devotion. He also made it possible for positive interactions between white people and black people by bringing them together to listen to his music. This was such a huge step in breaking racial barriers. By bringing people together with a common love of music, Joplin’s legacy lives in us all. He is truly worthy of the title: King of Ragtime.


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.