Roaring Twenties

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by EmmaSpencer7
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History

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Roaring Twenties

Henry Ford - Model TThe car was one of the most important inventions of the 1920s. Henry Ford introduced the Model T, which was the first car mass produced on an assembly line. The Model T was popular because Henry Ford sold them cheap, and many Americans could afford them. He paid his workers a minimum wage of $5, when other manufacturers barely paid their workers half of that. Henry Ford sold the Model T in one color only - a sturdy black. More Americans could travel since the Model T was affordable, so there was more fun and entertainment. Henry Ford registered over 23 million Model T's. In the 1920's, automobiles soon became America's biggest industry. Some people considered it as "The Golden Age of the Automobile." This video shows a Model T being made on an assembly line.

Roaring Twenties

Babe RuthBabe Ruth was one of the most famous baseball players in the 1920s. When he played for the Boston Red Sox, he was pitcher and sometimes he played first base. He played outfield when he was traded to the Yankees. He broke all the records in baseball, and the crowd loved him. In this picture, Babe Ruth is making the most famous swing in baseball history. Baseball players started playing the way he did, and the scores in games increased.

Teapot Dome ScandalThe Teapot Dome scandal was one of the worst scandals in American history. It started when Secretary of the Interior Albert Fall persuaded Harding to trade the control of three naval oil reserves to the Department of the Interior. Fall used the oil reserves for his own personal profits. This is a picture of Albert Fall.

Lost GenerationThe Lost Generation was the term given to a group of writers who gave up on American values after World War I. These people included F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and John Dos Passos. The Lost Generation defined the feeling of aimlessness in literary writers of the 1920s. One of the books written by F. Scott Fitzgerald was The Great Gatsby, and this is a copy of the book.

Jazz MusicThe 1920s was a decade of music and partying. From the Southern and Midwest blues came jazz. Jazz was an upbeat tune that was designed for dancing as well as listening. Some of the most famous jazz players of the 1920s include Louis Armstrong.

ProhibitionProhibition was the act that enforced the 18th Amendment, which made liquor, beer and wine illegal in America. President Hoover thought the amendment was "a great social and economic experiment." However, Americans continued to make and trade alcohol; they also started drinking more of it. Women, who weren't allowed to drink alcohol, started drinking it, too. In this picture. people in favor of prohibition are pouring out liquor.

FlappersThe 1920s were filled with dancing, and women created new fashions in their clothing styles. Women cut their hair in bobs, and wore dresses that revealed their knees, like the women dancing in this picture. These women became known as flappers. Flappers changed women's fashions for good.

Al CaponeDuring the 1920s, Al Capone was one of the most famous gangsters in America. Al Capone was known for bootlegging, drug trafficking, racketeering (threatening or forcing someone for money), and murder. Al Capone was the head of a multimillion-dollar bootlegging business. To get away with murder and other crimes, Al Capone would bribe the police and government officials. Whenever there was a murder case, he always had an alibi. This is a picture of Al Capone, one of America's most dangerous criminals.

President HardingPresident Harding was a Republican who ran for president after World War I. Americans quickly elected him president because of his folksy charm and he promised he'd return America to normalcy. President Harding chose many of his friends as cabinet members, and some of them turned out to be crooks. Unlike most other presidents, Harding let Congress make most decisions.


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