RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN EDUCATION

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by Crow1320
Last updated 1 year ago

Discipline:
Resources & Tools
Subject:
Lesson Planning
Grade:
6,7,8,9,10,11,12

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RESTORATIVE PRACTICES  IN EDUCATION

Identify the harm

"Everyone has a personal responsibility for reducing the risk of violence. We must take steps to maintain order, demonstrate mutual respect and caring for one another and ensure that children who are troubled get the help they need" (Finn, 2018).

"Evidence shows that zero tolerance policies as implemented have failed to achieve the goals of an effective system of school discipline" (American Psychologist Association, 2008, p.860)."The American Psychological Association (APA) Zero Tolerance Task Force, after evaluating school disciplinary policies for10 years, concluded that zero-tolerance policies fail to do what they were designed to do: they do not make schools safer" (Restorative Practices, 2014, p. 4). ~ May make schools less safe~ Hurts teacher/student relationships~ Doesn't help student with issues~ Students often worse off~ School-to-prison pipeline~ Endangers educational opportunities~ Drop-out and Incarceration higher rates (Restorative Practices, 2014)

RESTORATIVE PRACTICESIN EDUCATION

Violent/Negative incidents that might have been punishable = Restorative practices provide opportunities to: ~ Take responsibility for their actions. ~ Aware of the impact of their behavior~ Try to make things right~ Students learn about positive interactions with others~ See how their actions impact others, and change future behavior~ Encourage accountability~ Improve school safety~ Help strengthen relationships~ Positive outcomes for students and school (Alfred & Kidde, 2011)

Restorative Practices Research: Prison Fellowship International, Centre for Justice and Reconciliation The International Institute of Restorative PracticesHandbook of Restorative Justice (VanNess & Johnstone (Eds.), 2007)Restorative Practices Implementation: Implementing Restorative Justice: A Guide for Schools. (Ashley & Burke, 2009)Taking Restorative Justice to Schools: A Doorway to Discipline. (Holtham, 2009)Just Schools: A Whole-School Approach to Restorative Justice. (Hopkins, 2004)

Community ConferencingCommunity ServiceCircle ProcessInformal Restor. PracticesPeer JuriesPeer MediationPreventative & Post-Conflict Resolution ProgramsRestorative JusticeSocial-Emotional Learning (Restorative Practices, 2014)

Punitive Policies:~ What rules or laws were broken?~ Who broke the rules?~ What punishment do they deserve?(Alfred & Kidde, 2011)

Restorative Justice:~ What is the harm caused and to whom?~ What are the needs and obligations that have arisen?~ Who has the obligation to address the needs, to repair the harms, to restore relationships? (Alfred & Kidde, 2011)

"Restorative Justice is focused on the belief that those affected by harm can work together to repair itand that this collaboration leads to true accountability" (Alfred & Kidde, 2011, p. 5).

~ Academic difficulty~ Truancy~ Acting Out~ Psychological Trauma~ Mental Health Consequences~ Dropping Out~ Being Pushed out of School~ 33 Million Students are Suspended in U.S.~ Disproportionate impact on students of color and students with disabilities (Restorative Practices, 2014)

Types of Restorative Practices

EFFECTS OF ZERO-TOLERANCE

RESTORATIVE PRACTICES

RESOURCES: How can you implement at your school?

ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY

Involve allstakeholders

Repair harm and address causes

Watch this video on the benefits of Restorative Justice in Schools:

FEWER: fightsdisruptionssuspensions expulsions INCREASE: academic performanceSAFER SCHOOLS (Alfred & Kidde, 2011)

WHY Restorative Practices?


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