Ralph Waldo Emerson

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by gmspatriot19
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Writers Biographies
Grade:
6

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Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson was born on May 25th , 1803. The young Ralph Waldo Emerson's father died from stomach cancer on May 12th 1811, less than two weeks before Emerson's eighth birthday. Emerson attended the Boston Latin School, followed by Harvard University[frim which he graduated in 1821] and the Harvard school of Divinity. He made his living as a school master. Emerson met his first wife, Ellen Louisa Tucker, in Concord, New Hamphshire. He met her on Chrismas day in 1827. He married her when she was only 18. Less than two years later Ellen died from Tuberculosis. In January 24th 1835, Emerson wrote a letter to Lyndia Jackson proposing marriage. He recieved a letter back saying yes. Later in his life he wrote a speech comparing war to nature. He achieved being a very popular poet and he wrote popular essays. He was best known for writing inspirational poetry and essays about how to be polite and kind to one another. He ended up dying in 1882 because of pneumonia.

Fun Facts

1803 - Born1811 - Father died1826 - Licensed a Minister1829- Wife Dies 1835- Gets remarried1836 - Brother Charles Dies1882- Emerson Dies

-Emerson's father was a clergyman as many of his male ancestors had been.-He was an American Transcendentalism-He founded and co-edited the literary magazine The Dial, and he published two volumes of essays in 1841 and 1844.-He shared a key belief thateach individual could transcend, or move beyond, the physical world of the senses into deeper spiritual experience through free will and intuition.

Lasting Impact

He is best known for writing inspiational poetry and essays about how to be polite and kind to one another.

Citations

Zalben, Jane Breskin. Paths to Peace:People Who Changed the World. New York, NY: Dutton Children's Books, 2006. Print.

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