Princess Weetamoo

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by pv205129cps
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Literature
Grade:
6,7,8,9,10,11

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Princess Weetamoo

Summary In the tale of Princess Weetamoo, the daughter of Sachem Passaconway grows up in a lively Native American tribe. As she grows older, Weetamoo starts to dream of marriage. Passaconway found her a suitable husband named Winnipurket . Winnipurket was a the Sachem of a powerful tribe in Saugus. After celebrating their marriage, Weetamoo went to live with her newly wed husband. As time went on Weetamoo became lonely in her new home so she spoke to her husband and requested to return to her father's tribe again. Winnipurket eventually allowed the Princess to return to her father. However, having returned to her childhood tribe, Weetamoo now was now yearning for her husband. She was torn by whom to be with and went through mental conflict for weeks. Eventually Weetamoo escaped from her Great Sachems tribe and made the journey back to Saugus. On her journey, Weetamoo encountered an immense cataract where she is believed to have committed suicide from the overall metal conflicts.

Victoria Pedersen Ciulla

Princess Weetamooby Unknown Author

Major CharactersPrincess Weetamoo~ a fair, adventurous, and livley Native American; Daughter of the Sachem Passaconway. Passaconway~ the sachem of the Native American tribe of Pennacook; father of Weetamoo.Winnipurket~ sachem of the tribe in Saugus; Weetamoo's husband.

Literary Elements and DevicesIrony~ result or ending that is the opposite of what is expected. The author uses irony twice wihtin the tale:*First, when Weetamoo decides to marry a Sachem that is twice her age.* Secondly, Weetamoo deciding to make the journey back to her husband in Saugus alone.Mood~ the way the author portrays the scene with description and vivid language.*Describing the joy,lightness, and happiness in her childhood tribe and home with her father.*Describing the bleak surroundings during the Saugus Winter.


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