Poetry

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by Nicky20
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Poetry

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Poetry

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William Shakespeare (1564-1616). English poet and playwright – Shakespeare is widely considered to be the greatest writer in the English language. He wrote 38 plays and 154 sonnets. He wrote the Sonnet Number 18

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest; Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growest: So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

LYRIC POETRY• A short poem 8such as sonnet(14 lines) • The poet reveals strong personal thoughts and feelings written in first person.• Does not tell a story and is often a set of music.

NARRATIVE POETRY• It is a poem that tells a story. • Several characters like a short story or novel.• Describe a conflict• A resolution to a problem or conflict.• It often longer than other poems.

DESCRIPTIVE POETRY• This poem describe the world that surrounds the speaker.• It uses elaborate imagery and adjectives.• While emotional, it is more "outward-focused" than lyric poetry, which is more personal and introspective.

Notes

STANZA: are a series of lines grouped together and separated by an empty line from other stanzas.

Poetry

couplet (2 lines)tercet (3 lines)quatrain (4 lines)cinquain (5 lines)sestet (6 lines) (sometimes it's called a sexain)septet (7 lines)octave (8 lines)

A poem may or may not have a specific number of lines, rhyme scheme and/or metrical pattern, but it can still be labeled according to its form or style.

POEM

KINDS OF POETRY

SONNET 18

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