Palaeozoic

by sandovalkl
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Prehistory

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Palaeozoic

Pearl Farmer

Kaylee Sandoval, Megan Goldin, Ivanna Valverde, Ryhan Pettaway

Specialist's Job

The Problem

Solution

Other side: Harvesting causes less oysters to be in the open affecting the biodiversity. It is facing huge threats especially since climate change, overfishing and coastal development is already a huge effect to biodiversity. Although it could be bad, it could also put less pressure on fish stocks.

Specialist: On a pearl farm there are plastic bottles put into rows with mesh sacks attached to each one in a shallow part of the water. The harvester/farmer goes out in his boat and pulls up each bottle to check for any oysters that may have swam into the bag. He collects them in his boat and once the oysters have been extracted from the water, the harvester uses a meat cleaver to open the shells back on land. The pearls are still in their sac and membrane along with all of the meat from the animal, so the worker removes the pearl and puts the remaining meat elsewhere to be bagged and shipped so it can be used for its many uses.

Solution: In order to start with a great pearl farm you must have a great marine ecosystem, high knowledge and skill and several years of patience. To start, make sure you have a healthy oyster which can be found by artificial collectors or be artificially spawned in hatcheries. The nets should be unharmful and proper. One thing to keep in mind is that not all oysters survive and not all of them will produce a pearl. Making sure the water is correct and the environment is natural can help the growth in pearl production.

Problem: The size and shape of the irritant in the oyster causes the pearl to be the shape that it is. This makes round pearls rare because most have unique shapes. Also where in the shell the pearl grows affects the shape of it. If the pearls starts to grow against the shell then it will be flat on one side. Typically the rounder the pearl the more desirable and therefore valuable they are. The lustre on the pearl or the shininess is caused by the growth condition. The pearls can’t be quickly harvested or else they will not have a good amount of lustre.Environmental deterioration or sudden ecological changes will also affect the oyster and hamper its potential for producing a high-quality pearl, as pearl oysters are remarkably sensitive organisms. Overfishing in an areas can also cause oysters to be worse because if they get brought up in the nets the pearl may get destroyed.

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Relates to us: This relates to us because if the pearls are affected by the environment changing then we will be able to see that. So we can use pearls as a way to see how good or poor the environment is in that area. Not only will it affect pearls but it could end up hurting the rest of the ocean.

Why:Growth rates can be affected by temperature, food quantity and quality, salinity, boring organisms, and disease. Japan has more freshwater plantations than saltwater this is why the Japanese pearls turn out to be smaller than the ones in Tahiti. Oysters usually take three to five years to get to market size but in places like Tahiti where the water is warmer and saltier they can reach that size in as little as one to two years.Sterile (triploid) oysters grow faster because they are not expending energy on reproduction, enabling them to reach market size sooner


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