Night

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by allystassi
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Book Reports
Grade:
10

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Night

NightBy: Elie Wiesel

Every family and culture develops their own traditions that they grow accustomed to, but overtime those traditions may change or even get lost.

After the soup, we gathered between the bunks. The veterans told us: "You're lucky to have been brought here so late. Today, this is paradise compared to what the camp was two years ago. Back then, Buna was a veritable hell. No water, no blankets, less soup and bread..." (Ch.5 Pg. 70)Stories were a biug part of not only their religion, but their culture. The type of stories adjusted though. They were no longer for pleasure but for fear. They were now told in order to scare people, as if they weren't afraid of tomorrow as it is.

"Why do you pray?" he asked after a moment. Why did I pray? Strange question. Why did I live? Why did I breathe? "I don't know," I told him, even more troubled and ill at ease."I don't know." (Ch.1 Pg.4)At the beginning of the story Eliezer prays very often. He calims he's unsure of why he does it. Praying is a part of this young boys religion.

Someone began to recite Kaddish, the prayer for the dead. I don't know whether, during the history of the Jewish people, men have ever before recited Kaddish for themselves. "Yisgadal, veyiskadash, shmey raba…May His name be celebrated and sanctified…" whispered my father. For the first time, I felt anger rising within me. (Ch.3 Pg.33)Elie feels he shouldn't anctify God name for the time being. Until God proves that he's listening Elie wants nothing more to do with Him.

Blessed be God's name? Why, but why would I bless Him? Every fiber in me rebelled. Because He caused thousands of children to burn in His mass graves? (Ch.5 Pg.67)The Jews are all praying but Elie sees no point anymore. God never seems to answer him.

YOM KIPPUR. The Day of Atonement. Should we fast? (Ch.5 Pg.69)It is tradition to fast as part of the Jewish religion. Elie decides not to fast. His father had told him no, for it would lead to a much faster death. Also, he no longer accepted God's silence.

http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/resource_center/item.asp?gate=2-48


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