Native Americans of California's Coast

In Glogpedia

by 21LiAaron
Last updated 7 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History
Grade:
4

Toggle fullscreen Print glog
Native Americans of California's Coast

The Chumash roasted meat and fish over the fire and made shellfish into soup. Acorns, the most important plant food, took a long time to prepare. Dried, shelled acorns were ground to a powder with a stone mortar and pestle. The bitter tannic acid was removed by pouring water through the meal. Finally, the acorn flour was mixed with water in a tightly woven basket and cooked with red-hot stones placed into the liquid. While stirring the mixture, the liquid soon boiled and thickened. The Chumash ate this acorn soup with every meal. Other seeds were toasted and ground to a paste.

Imformation By:http://www.sbnature.org/research/anthro/chumash/health.htm

Native Americans of California's Northern Coastal Region

Their lives were not as long as ours. The average life expectancy may have only been about 35, or even less, although that is similar to life expectancy of Europeans at the same period. Some elders survived into their 70s and 80s. Chumash elder Fernando Librado Kitsepawit was born in 1839 at the San Buenaventura Mission and was the last known full-blooded island Chumash. He died in 1915 in Santa Barbara.

The Chumash used the bow and arrow beginning about 1,500 years ago. Before that, they used the spear thrower. They also used a harpoon with a detachable foreshaft for spearing large fish. They made curved, circular fishhooks from abalone and mussel shells for catching smaller fish.

The Chumash used the bow and arrow beginning about 1,500 years ago. Before that, they used the spear thrower. They also used a harpoon with a detachable foreshaft for spearing large fish. They made curved, circular fishhooks from abalone and mussel shells for catching smaller fish.


Comments

    There are no comments for this Glog.