Nathanael Greene

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by DuncanGerkin
Last updated 8 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History
Grade:
8

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Nathanael Greene

Greene became a member of a militia known as the Kentish Guards. When the people of Rhode Island heard of the battles of Lexington and Concord, Greene rushed to Boston to offer his services. He was appointed the rank of Major General and put in charge of 1,600 soldiers. In 1775, while stationed around Boston, Greene met George Washington and they ended up becoming life-long friends. His rank was demoted when Washington arrived though, he was now a Brigadier General. Greene was sent to defend New York, where he was eventually forced to retreat.

Then, under the leadership of Washington and Greene the U.S. earned to key victories in New Jersey. He also participated in battles at Brandywine and Germantown. At Valley Forge Greene was key in keeping the American troops together.

Greene led attacks in the south and eventually defeated Lord Cornwallis. He made stands in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. In 1783 Greene left the army and settled in Savannah, Georgia on a plantation with his wife and children. Georgia had given him 24, 000 acres of land of his choice for his efforts in the war. He was exposed to hot sun rays for a long period of time at a friend's plantation. when he returned home he became very sick. On June 19, 1786, Greene died of sunstroke. He had been well known and helped many people. He was a major reason why we won the Revolutionary War.

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene was a major general in the Revolutionary War and George Washington's most dependable officers

The Greene family was one of the first families to settle in Rhode Island. Nathanael was born on July 27, 1742. He didn't have a great education, but he loved to read. He eventually had a very large library. He was a Christian and had great knowledge of the Bible. He based his life around the Bible. Greene also studied many books on military science.


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