Morality of Slavery

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by meghanmcnealy
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
African-American History

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Morality of Slavery

Morality of Slavery Meghan McNealy

John. C. Calhoun

John C. Calhoun has a contradicting point of view on the slavery system than abolitionists. He looks at the facts, like the abolitionists, but in a differnt way. Calhoun says, "Never before has the black race of Central Africa, from the dawn of history to the present day, attained a condition so civilized and so improved, not only physically, but morally and intellectually.". Calhoun beleives that slavery has a positive factor for blacks. He shows this by finding facts that abolitionists would not posses, and uses them against the abolitionists' beliefs.

William Lloyd Garrison

William Lloyd Garrison's Address to the Slaves of the United States shows how slaves can rely on the abolitionists of the north. He says how the northern abolitionists were friends of the slaves and that they would become free of their chains with no harm towards the owners of the slaves. Garrison also says that the weapons they use to help are not guns and bows, but arguments, warnings, and facts. All of these "weapons" will show everyone with a straight conscience that no matter the skin color, everyone is the same.

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was born into slavery, but escaped at the age of 20. Frederick then went on to be an abolitionist. He would speak of personal experiences as a slave to show to people how cruel the slave system was. Fredericks talked about the physical and mental pain of being a slave. Torture, starvation, and whips are just a few of the methods used to contain slaves. Fredericks point of view on people who are not against slavery have long lost right that are yet to be restored.

Sources

- Address to the Slaves of the United States by William Lloyd Garrison- Slavery a Positive Good by John C. Calhoun- My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass


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