Mohandas Karamchand Ghandi

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Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Historical biographies

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Mohandas Karamchand Ghandi

- Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on October 2, 1869 in Porbandar, Gujarat, India. Several members of his family worked for the government of the state. When Gandhi was 18 years old, he went to England to study law. After he became a lawyer, he went to the British colony of South Africa where he experienced laws that said people with dark skin had fewer rights than people with light skin. He decided then to become a political activist, so he could help change these unfair laws. He created a powerful, non-violent movement. During Gandhi's life, India was a colony of the United Kingdom, but wanted independence.

As An Activist

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

- Truth-Nonviolence-Vegetarianism and food-Influences-Religion

In 1930, Gandhi led the Salt March.When he returned to India, he helped cause India's independence from British rulePeople of many different religions and ethnic groups lived in British India.Gandhi was a Hindu, but he liked ideas from many religions including Islam, Judaism and Christianity, and he thought that people of all religions should have the same rightsIn 1938, Gandhi resigned from CongressIn 1947, British Indian Empire became independent, and broke into two different countries, India and Pakistan.

Ghandi's İmpact

Gandhi's principle of satyagraha, often translated as "way of truth" or "pursuit of truth", has inspired other democratic and anti-racist activists like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Nelson Mandela. Gandhi often said that his values were simple, based upon traditional Hindu beliefs: truth (satya), and non-violence (ahimsa).

Citations

http://www.lausd.net/Belvedere_MS/student_work/Gandhi/Accomplishmentshttp://www.sparknotes.com/biography/gandhi/summary.htmlhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TyPaMxk6VpQhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahatma_Gandhi

Biography

A Short Video

Principles, Practices and Beliefs


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