Mississippi Flood of 1927

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Earth Sciences

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Mississippi Flood of 1927

What was It?

The Broken Levees

Destroyed Homes

The Mississippi Flood of 1927

The Mississippi Flood was a disasterous flood that led to many issues in the future and affected many people.

The South recieved heavy rains that caused the river to swell. Due to so much water, almost the entire levee system was ruined, causing a horrible flood.

The lower Mississippi River was where the levees broke in April of 1927. 23,000 square miles of land were submerged from this flood. It took over two months for the water to receed.

How Did it Happen?

When and Where Did it Happen?

This flood affected thousands of people. 250 people were killed from the flood and thousands were displaced from their homes.

Who Did it Affect?

The Mississippi Flood led to a number of deaths and ruined thousands of homes. In addition, it caused a huge problem with racial discrimination. Many black people had to work in dangerous conditions to try to repair the damage. They were left for several days without food while white people were hauled to safety.

Importance and Impacts of 1927

1.) In New Orleans, there were 15 inches of rain in 18 hours. 2.) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ensured civilians that the levees would hold. 3.) James Eads proposed to form cut-offs because these would make the river run faster, making it deeper. 4.) The river was 70 miles wide before it started to recede. 5.) The amount of water that came through the levees was twice the amount in Niagara Falls.

5 Historical Facts

The way black people were treated during this flood greatly impacted their take on politics. They were no longer loyal to the republican party and soon became loyal to the democratic party. In addition, it led to the Great Migration. This was when many African Americans moved from the South to northern cities.

Importance and Impacts of Today

http://www.britannica.com/http://news.nationalgeographic.com/

Sources


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