Martin Luther King Jr

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by apiuser
Last updated 5 years ago

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Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
African-American History
Grade:
3

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Martin Luther King Jr

Martin Luther King Jr. was a civil rights activist in the 1950s and 1960s. He led non-violent protests to fight for the rights of all people including African Americans. He hoped that America and the world could become a colorblind society where race would not impact a person's civil rights. He is considered one of the great orators of modern times and his speeches still inspire many to this day. In his first major civil rights action, Martin Luther King Jr. led the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This started when Rosa Parks refused to move to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. As a result, Martin led a boycott of the public transportation system. The boycott lasted for over a year. It was very tense at times. Martin was arrested and his house was bombed, but in the end he prevailed and segregation on the Montgomery busses ended.

1929 - Born1953 - Marries Coretta Scott1957 - Forms Southern Christian Leadership Conference1960 - Becomes co-pastor with his father1963 - March on Washington1968 - Assassinated

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.""We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.""Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the whole staircase."

Lasting Impact

Martin Luther King Jr. had enormous impact on the desegregation of the United States in the 1960's. He had arguable the largest impact of any civil rights leader of his time.

Citations

Sources"Martin Luther King, Jr. Quotes." BrainyQuote. Xplore, n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2014."Martin Luther King Jr." Kid's Biography:. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Mar. 2014.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Biography

Timeline

Famous Quotes

The March on Washington


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