[2015] Victoria Baker: Manatee

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by DeesA2014
Last updated 5 years ago

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Subject:
Zoology
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1,2,3

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[2015] Victoria Baker: Manatee

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Manatees are gentle moving marine mammals. They spend most of their day swimming slowly, eating, and resting.Manatees do not breathe under water like fish do. They hold their breath while they swim around. When manatees are active they come up for air every 3 to 5 minutes. If they're resting they can hold their breath for 20 minutes. Wow!Fun Fact: The manatee has a funny nickname. Sometimes people them a "sea cow".

West Indian Manatee or"Florida Manatee"

Baby Manatees

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A baby manatee is called a calf. It weighs 60-70 pounds when born. It can be up to 4 feet long. They can swim as soon as they're born, but they still depend on their mother for 2 years. The mother protects and nurses the calf.

Manatees

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Adult manatees are 10 feet long and weigh between 800 and 3,000 pounds. That's about the size of a small car! Their lifespan is around 60 years.Manatees migrate together when the seasons change. They don't like cold water. In the winter they swim down to warm Floridian waters. This is why the West Indian manatee is nicknamed the "Florida manatee".When it's summer again they slowly swim back to cooler waters away from Florida. They don't like their water too hot or too cold. They are very picky!Manatees usually stay in the southern waters of the United States. In the summer they visit states like Alabama, Texas, and Georgia.

Manatees are herbavores. This means they do not eat meat. They eat plants that grow in the water.Their front flippers help them bring food to their mouth.Fun Fact: They have been known to accidently eat fish because they're eating so fast!

Manatees are on the Endangered List. That means they are in danger of going extinct. When something does extinct it is gone forever!

Let's

1. Slowing our boats down

2. Keeping our waters clean

3. Reporting hurt manatees

Click the heart for more manatee information!

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