Maliseet Tribe

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by KierstGr
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
American History
Grade:
7

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Maliseet Tribe

Daily LifeThey play with each other, go to school and help around the house. Many Maliseet children like to go hunting and fishing with their fathers. In the past, Indian kids had more chores and less time to play, just like colonial children. But they did have dolls and toys to play with, and the boys liked to play a ball-kicking game.

LanguageMaliseet is pronounced MAL-uh-seet. It means "talks imperfectly" in Mi'kmaq, the language of a neighboring tribe. Maliseet people call themselves Wolastoqiyik in their own language, which refers to a river that runs through the Maliseet homeland.

Literature and artsMaliseet artists are famous for their Native American beadwork. Some early Europeans thought Maliseets made the most beautiful beadwork of all the American Indians. Maliseet people also wove baskets out of birchbark and ash splints. Like other eastern American Indians, Maliseets crafted wampum out of white and purple shell beads. Wampum beads were traded as a kind of currency, but they were more culturally important as an art material. The designs and pictures on wampum belts often told a story or represented a person's family.

The History Of The Maliseet's

Economy (1800's)Traditionally the Maliseet were hunters, fishers, and gatherers. In the seventeenth century they adopted some horticulture, particularly maize cultivation, which remained of secondary importance into the twentieth century. Some had gardens where potatoes and other root vegetables were grown for family consumption and a very few had small acreage in oats and wheat. The caribou and moose were the major large game animals taken, with the white-tailed deer replacing the caribou in the early twentieth century.

Current IssuesThe Maliseet of New Brunswick experienced problems of unemployment and poverty common to Aboriginal people elsewhere in Canada, but they have evolved a sophisticated and intricate system of decision making and resource allocation, especially at Tobique where they support community enterprises in economic development, scouting and sports.

Maliseet Maps

Present Day EconomyThe Maliseet of New Brunswick experienced problems of unemployment and poverty common to Aboriginal people elsewhere in Canada, but they have evolved a sophisticated and intricate system of decision making and resource allocation, especially at Tobique where they support community enterprises in economic development, scouting and sports. Some are successful in middle and higher education and have important trade and professional standings; individuals and families are prominent in Aboriginal and women's rights; and others serve in provincial and federal native organizations, in government and in community development.

Maliseet ReligionSome Maliseet see strong Parallels between him and the Christian deity, but insist that Kuloskap was never worshipped. Certainly some syncretism of Religious traditions is present. The universe was populated with numerous other supernaturals that took animal or part human, part animal forms. Most were thought detrimental to the welfare of humans and had to be controlled by Kuloskap.

Economy (1492)The Maliseet, unlike the Passamaquoddy, think of themselves as inland hunters and freshwater fishers rather than salt-water and coastal hunters and fishers. The manufacture of crafts, especially splint ash work baskets, birchbark canoes, and snowshoes made by the men and fancy baskets of splint ash and sweet hay made by the women, supplemented income from trapping, guiding, employment on river drives, stevedoring and other day or seasonal labor for nineteenthand early-twentieth-century Maliseet men. Until the 1950s many families worked in the potato harvest for White farmers in northern Maine and New Brunswick each autumn.

BibliogophyGoogle ImagesFacts For Kids: Maliseet tribeWikipedia


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