Malcolm X

In Glogpedia

by Ayane
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
African-American History
Grade:
11

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Malcolm X

Malcolm X was an African American leader who led movements against the ideology of White Supremacy. He was greatly influenced by Elijah Muhammad, a self claimed "prophet" of Islam, and came to adhere to the Islamic faith. Although at first he was filled with strong hatred towards White men and even to his own race, after visiting Mecca, he learned that race doesn't play a role when it comes down to who a person really is; it's who the individual is at heart that counts. For his time, he was "deviant" because he performed acts that were extremely taboo; at a time when racial segregation and discrimination was severe, he spoke out and propogated equal rights.

His "Deviance"

1925 - Malcolm isorn1943 - Moves to Harlem, NY1946 - Sentenced to prison1947 - Encounters Elijah Muhammad1953 - Becomes a part of the Nation of Islam1964 - Travels to Mecca and develops a new point of view of White men; Resigns from the Nation of Islam1965 - He is shot

Firstly, he embraces the Conflict Perpective because he greatly focused on the racial inequality and injustice in America; he fought the prejudice against African Americans. In addition, he is also an exemplar of the Cultural Transmission Theory; because he was influenced by Elijah Muhammad, another "deviant" individual who fought against the idea of White Supremacy, Malcolm X became a strong follower of the anti-racism movement. Therefore, Elijah Muhammad's "deviance" transmitted to Malcolm.

Lasting Impact

Malcolm X changed the history of America forever because he was able to convey that an African American man possesses the same sensitivity, potential, and intellect that any other White man may have.

Citations

The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told By Alex Haleyhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wm9pEWIPjkshttp://www.malcolm-x.org/bio/timeline.htm

Malcolm X

Biography

Timeline

Who Taught You to Hate Yourself?


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