Linhardt,Haas,fox, Miller Cherokee

by MorrisFA2014
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
History
Grade:
9

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Linhardt,Haas,fox, Miller Cherokee

Where the Cherokee was originally from: Before the removal,most cherokee lived on farms that consisted of parents and children,or an extended family of at least three generations. Disorganized bands of Cherokees forged themselves into a strong national political state, created their own native alphabet, adopted a written constitution, and ultimately provided political, social, and economic leadership not only for the tribe but for the nation. The Cherokees owned little personal property. Hunting and warfare were central to the life of the aboriginal Cherokees; the tribe had embraced limited agriculture and planted fields which helped the hunt. How the Cherokee live in the years prior to removal: Before the removal, most cherokee lived on farms that consisted of parents and children,or an extended family of at least three generations. Disorganized bands of Cherokees forged themselves into a strong national political state, created their own native alphabet, adopted a written constitution, and ultimately provided political, social, and economic leadership not only for the tribe but for the nation. The Cherokees owned little personal property. Hunting and warfare were central to the life of the aboriginal Cherokees; the tribe had embraced limited agriculture and planted fields which helped the hunt. Process of the Cherokee removal:In 1838-39 Cherokee Trail of Tears U.S. troops, prompted by the state of Georgia, expelled the Cherokee Indians from their ancestral homeland in the Southeast and removed them to the Indian Territory in what is now Oklahoma. The removal of the Cherokees was a demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians. Also many Georgians wanted money,money,money.The Cherokees had lived in the Southeast, including north Georgia, for hundreds of years. European ancestors began moving into Cherokee territory in the early eighteenth century;the colonial governments in the area began demanding that the Cherokees cede their territory. By the end of the Revolutionary War, the Cherokees had surrendered more than half of their original territory to state and federal governments. In 1827 the Cherokees adopted a written constitution, an act that further antagonized removal proponents in Georgia.The Georgia legislature passed laws abolishing the indians. In 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, which authorized the president to negotiate removal treaties. John Ridge and Elias Boudinot, signed the Treaty of New Echota at the Cherokee capital without the authority of Principal Chief Ross or the Cherokee government. The treaty required the Cherokee Nation to exchange its national lands for a parcel in the "Indian Territory" and to relocate there within two years. This parcel, set aside by Congress in 1834, was located in what is now Oklahoma. The federal government promised to remit five million to the Cherokee Nation, compensate individuals for their buildings and fixtures, and pay for the costs of relocation and acclimation. The United States also promised to honor the title of the Cherokee Nation's new land, respect its political autonomy, and protect its tribe from future trespasses.What the Cherokee removal was like: 1. The Trail of Tears. (Nu-No-Du-Na-Tlo-Hi-Lu).2. It happened on May 26, 1838.4. President Andrew Jackson, Provided for the removal of all Indians to the West.3. Federal troops forced thousands of Cherokee from their homes in Southeastern United States, driving them toward Indian Territory of Eastern Oklahoma.4.More than 4,000 died of disease and starvation along the way.5. For years the Cherokee had resisted removal from their land in every way they knew. Convinced that white America rejected Native Americans because they were ¨savages,¨ CHerokee leaders established a republic with a European-style legislature and legal system.6.Though in the end the Cherokee embrace of ¨civilization¨ and their landmark legal victory proved no match for white land hunger and military power, the Cherokee people were able, with characteristic ingenuity, to build a new life in Oklahoma, far from the land that had sustained them for generations. Significant leaders of the Cherokee: Sequoya invented the Cherokee alphabet that had over 80 characters. By using the alphabet the Cherokee was able to publish newspaper and books in their own language. He also served with the United States Army during the Creek War. Wilma Mankiller was the first woman to be a chief of the Cherokee Nation. When she was leader the population rose from 55,000 156,000. She would help renovate houses and build water systems for the Cherokee Nation. At one time she was also the leader of a matrilineal society. John Ross became principal leader of the eastern branch of the Cherokee in 1828. He also served as president of the National Council of the Cherokee from 1819 to 1826.

"CHEROKEE." CHEROKEE. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Jan. 2014."Cherokee Indians." New Georgia Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Jan. 2014.“Famous Cherokees" Thinkquest. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.Garrison, Tim A. "Cherokee Removal." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 09 December 2013. Web. 27 January 2014.“We Shall Remain” http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/the_films/episode_3_about

Georgia

Cherokee Indian

John Ross

Indian Territory/Oklahoma

Work Cited

OKlahoma HIstory

Cherokee Indians


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