Language in Much Ado About Nothing

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by DrZerne
Last updated 5 years ago

Discipline:
Language Arts
Subject:
Book Reports
Grade:
12

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Language in Much Ado About Nothing

The Power of Language in William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

"Oh, that I were a man for his sake! Or that I had any friend would be a man for my sake! But manhood is melted into curtsies, valor into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones too. He is now as valiant as Hercules that only tells a lie and swears it. I cannot be a man with wishing, therefore I will die a woman with grieving" (Shakespeare, 1600).

"O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou beenIf half thy outward graces had been placedAbout thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart!But fare thee well, most foul, most fair! Farewell,Thou pure impiety and impious purity." (Shakespeare, 1600)

"But masters, remember that I am an ass, though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.—No, thou villain, thou art full of piety, as shall be proved upon thee by good witness. I am a wise fellow and, which is more, an officer and, which is more, a householder and, which is more, as pretty a piece of flesh as any is in Messina, and one that knows the law, go to, and a rich fellow enough, go to, and a fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and everything handsome about him.—Bring himaway.—Oh, that I had been writ down an ass!" (Shakespeare, 1600)

"While Hero was painfully aware of the effects of slander on her reputation, her place in society, and her marriage prospects, Dogberry seems clueless not only of the impact of being publickly labeled an ass, but of the meaning of the word" (Cassal 2010).

Cassal, S. (2010). "Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing." The Explicator 64.3: 139-141.

Cassal, S. (2010). "Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing." The Explicator 64.3: 139-141. Retrieved 7 December 2015 from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3200/EXPL.64.3.139-141?journalCode=vexp20Dicksee, F. (1896). Beatrice [Online image]. Retrieved 7 December 2015 from http://luna.folger.edu/luna/servlet/s/qq35j6Enmore, A. W. (1846). Much Ado About Nothing [Online image]. Retrieved 7 December 2015 from http://journey-and-destination.blogspot.in/2013/09/shakespeare-scenes-in-art.htmlMarks, H. S. (1853). Dogberry Examining Conrade and Borachio [Online image]. Retrieve 7 December 2015 from http://shakespeare.emory.edu/illustrated_showimage.cfm?imageid=317Much Ado Kill Claudio Scene [Online video]. (2007). Retrieved 7 December 2015 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WDos5YgNjIMuch Ado Quarto [Online image]. (n.d.). Retrieved 7 December 2015 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Much_Ado_Quarto.JPGShakespeare, W. (1600). Much Ado About Nothing. The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: Norton, 1997. 1381-1444.Taylor, J. (1856). William Shakespeare [Online image]. Retrieved 7 December 2015 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:William_shakespeare_dm.jpg.

References

Beatrice

Scholarly Commentary

Claudio

Dogberry


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