John Adams

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by lcdsglogger
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
Politicians and Presidents

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John Adams

John Adams was born on October 30, 1735 in Braintree Massachusetts, which is now known as Quincy. In 1755 he graduated from Harvard University with a degree in law, he was 20 years old at the time. In 1758 he was admitted to the bar, which meant he could practice law. On October 25, 1764 John Adams married his wife Abigail Smith, who would then be known as Abigail Adams. Abigail was his third cousin, they would go on to have six children. Those children were Abigail (1765), John Quincy (1767), Susanna (1768), Charles (1770), Thomas Boylston (1772) and Elizabeth (1777). John Quincy Adams would become the sixth president of the United States. John Adams died on July 4, 1826, his last words were, “Thomas Jefferson still survives.”

Political Career

During his political career John Adams served as a diplomat to England, the first diplomat to England since the revolution. He was also a delegate to the first and second Continental Congress. He served two terms as the Vice President, before becoming the President in 1797. He often felt that the office of vice president was very limited and more ceremonial than anything else. During the presidency he had to deal with the XYZ affair, that boosted his popularity points when he refused to pay the bribe requested by the French. He was the first president to live in the White House, he moved in on November 1, 1800.

Lasting Impact

John Adams forever changed America and the world by ending the XYZ affair. He also was a diplomat to England, and during his time there he was able to start trade between the two nations. This trade made America much richer and much more powerful, the trade agreement would one day become an alliance between the two countries. John Adams was a wonderful politician and one of the best presidents the United States has ever had.

John Adams

Personal Life


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