Jennie Wade

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by Amyers227
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World History

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Jennie Wade

During the Battle of Gettysburg, Jennie helped feed and give aid to soldiers outside her sister's house. On the third day of the battle, as Jennie was making bread to feed the soldiers, she was hit by a bullet. It killed her instantly. Her family would move her body to the basement until the battle ended, and then bury her outside the house in the garden.

Jennie Wade's full name was Mary Virginia Wade. Her friends and family called her Jennie. During the Battle of Gettysburg, Jennie went to stay with her sister, Georgia McClellan, who had just given birth to a son a few days before the battle began!

Who was Jennie Wade?

Jennie Wade

What happened?

Jennie was supposed to have been engaged to Jack Skelly before the battle began. However, she, Jack Skelly, and another childhood friend, Wesley Culp, would all be killed within the three day battle. Today, it is said that if an unwed woman places her ring finger in the bullet hole of the door, she will be married within the next year. It is Jennie's way of helping girls marry since she did not get to herself.

Marriage

"...some of the women who staid home proved to be heroines and did all in their power to aid the wounded...One young girl, I heard, was killed while making bread for the soldiers, the house she was in having been in musket range of the rebels." -Robert S. Robertson, 93rd NY Infantryman

Today, visitors to Gettysburg can relive Jennie's experiences at the house of her sister. The tour explains how Jennie helped wounded soldiers. It also shows visitors how she died, and how her family cared for her body following her death. Jennie is now buried at Evergreen Cemetery in Gettysburg. She is buried about 100 yards from her betrothed, Jack Skelly.

Remembering Jennie

Jennie's Experience

Jennie's Folklore

Sources:http://pabook.libraries.psu.edu/palitmap/Shriver.html The Jennie Wade Story by Cindy L. SmallRobert S. Robertson's Diary, 1861-64


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