Japenese American Assembly Center

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Japenese American Assembly Center

Japenese American Assembly CentersReported by: Isabella BarnettMs.Noji Period 1

Works Cited"Interview with Sam Ozaki, Internee at Jerome Relocation Center." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "A | More | Perfect | Union." A | More | Perfect | Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . Usa. Library of Congress. Japenese American Internment Durring World War 2. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2014Works Cited"Interview with Sam Ozaki, Internee at Jerome Relocation Center." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "A | More | Perfect | Union." A | More | Perfect | Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . Usa. Library of Congress. Japenese American Internment Durring World War 2. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2014Works Cited"Interview with Sam Ozaki, Internee at Jerome Relocation Center." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "A | More | Perfect | Union." A | More | Perfect | Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . Works Cited"Interview with Sam Ozaki, Internee at Jerome Relocation Center." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "A | More | Perfect | Union." A | More | Perfect | Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 1). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . "National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16)." National Park Service: Confinement and Ethnicity (Chapter 16). N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. . Usa. Library of Congress. Japenese American Internment Durring World War 2. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2014Usa. Library of Congress. Japenese American Internment Durring World War 2. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 17 May 2014

What was life in assembly centers like?Life in assembly centers was anything but plesant. The living space per person was about 2X4 feet, medical care was sparce at best, bathroom acomidations were minisqule and security was so intense that it could be compared to being worse than being a jail. Horse stalls were turned into six person homes, equipt with a lightbulb and army cots. Health care was horrible since there were to many health issues and not enogh medical staff. The ratio of showers to people at some camps were 1 to 23. Security at the assembaly centers consisted of watch towers, strict curfews, roll call that took place twice a day and mail searches. These were only a few of the outrageous conditions that took place at the assembaly centers. Here is what one survivor said:“And I never will forget, the train stopped and we got off and they put us on a big truck. It looked like one of those cattle cars. Anyway, we stood up because there were no chairs for us to sit on this pickup and crowded into this truck. They drove us to the Fresno Assembly Center. And then we got off there and they told us to get in and there was the barbed wire gate, and the MPs around there and uh... We had to go in through that gate and after we got in there we knew that the gate was shut. And so, we saw all these people behind the fence, looking out, hanging onto the wire, and looking out because they were anxious to know who was coming in. But I will never forget the shocking feeling that human beings were behind this fence like animals [crying]. And we were going to also lose our freedom and walk inside of that gate and find ourselves... cooped up there. And the police, the MPs with their guns and some of them had bayonets. I don't know what they were going to do with it, if they thought we were gong to run away I guess. But anyway, when the gates were shut, we knew that we had lost something that was very precious; that we were no longer free.” (Mary Tsukamoto Interview, Copyright 2001 Smithsonian Institution)

When \where were the assembly centers?Assembly centers were in race tracks and fair grounds that were turned into temporary houses for the Japanese Americans who were being relocated (congress, 5/17). People spent an avradge of 3 months in these camps before moving onto long term concentration camps (Linke, 5/17). People lived in cramped livestock pens and scraped together buildings called barracks. There were twelve assembly centers in the USA. They were located in Arizona, California, Oregon and Washington (ibid). The centers were occupied from March 27 through October 30, 1942. 92,000 people of Japanese heritage stayed in these assembly centers (ibid).

The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet connectionIn The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet Keiko and her family gat taken away on large trains with all the other Japanese. Keiko’s father says that they are going to Puyallup. Puyallup was the closest relocation center to Seattle and it was one of the first to open.

Why were there assembly centers? Assembly centers were needed to temporarily house the Japanese Americans who were being relocated to concentration camps. The concentration camps were not finished when the Japanese Americans were evacuated so they needed somewhere to stay. They were evacuated in such a hurry because Executive Order 9066 gave the military full control of the west coast (Linke, 5/17). The order was signed the day after the Pearl Harbor bombing to try to prevent another one from occurring.


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  • Momochan 5 years ago

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