Jack Roosevelt Robinson

In Glogpedia

by khaylaspears
Last updated 6 years ago

Discipline:
Health & Fitness
Subject:
Sports
Grade:
8

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Jack Roosevelt Robinson

Since teams were segregated at the time, Jackie played for the negro teams and was later choosen by Branch Rickey to help integrate major league baseball. "Jackie achieved many goals during his lifetime."- Eric Foner "Up until his death, in 1972, Jackie showed his for baseball.Even though it was a tough time, Robinson and his family put up with the death threats and racial slurs."- John A. Garraty

-In 1995, he helped the dodgers win the world series-He retired in 1957-He had a career batting average of .311.-Died in Connecticut in 1972-Named the regions MVP in baseball in 1938

After being discharged from the army in 1944, Jackie begn to play baseball professionally.

Jack Roosevelt Robison

He was transferred to University of California, Los Angeles. While attending UCLA, he became the university's first student to win varsity lettes in four sports. He was later forced to leave UCLA due to financial problems. He moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, and played for the Honolulu Bears. His season with the Bears was cut short once the United State went into World War II. From 1942 to 1944, Jackie served as second lieutenant in the United States Army. During boot camp in 1944, in Fort Hood, Texas, Jackie was arrested after refusing to give up his seat and move to the back of a segregated bus when the bus driver ordered him to.

Citations:

Foner, Eric, "Baseball's Great Experiment: Jackie Robinson and his legacy,1984 (editor)Garraty, John A. "Baseball's Great Experiment: Jackie Robinson and his legacy,1984 (editor)Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publish Company

Jack Roosevelt Robinson, born January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia, became the first African American player in the major leagues in 1947. Jackie attented John Muir High School and played five sports: track, basketball,baseball,football and tennis. He also attended Pasedena Juinor College.


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