Integrated Learning

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by Amzrach
Last updated 5 years ago

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Integrated Learning

What is Integrated Learning?

Why use Integrated Learning?

Multiple Integrations

Maths and LiteracyExample: Students read books, articles or research different types of shops/ super markets. Students are then required to create their own shop in the classroom. Through using social skills and collaboration, the class as a whole builds a mini shop. They decide on prices and individual jobs. Students can write up reports, recipes, advertising, etc while using their maths skills to calculate buying, stock take, fees and finances.

“Research has consistently shown thatstudents in integrated programs demonstrateacademic performance equal to, orbetter than, students in discipline-basedprograms. In addition, students are moreengaged in school, and less prone toattendance and behaviour problems.”(Drake & Reid, 2010)

How to incorporate Integrated Learning into Mathematics

Maths and GeographyExample: Students are about to set sail on a voyage from one side of the world to the other. Students will incorporate ICT to research the largest ports in the world as their starting and finishing points. Students will be able to use an atlas to use longitude and latitude to plan their trip and will be able to calculate speed, distance and time of their journey. Extension: Students to build their ship using every day materials which also incorporates sustainability.

Maths and ScienceExample: Students to grow plants in their classroom using a plastic cup, seeds, cotton wool and water. Students are to use their biological science knowledge to grow plants and measure their success over a two week period. Students use their mathematical knowledge about measurement and data collection to discover plant growth rates over a specific time frame.

Maths and Health/ Physical EducationExample: Students are to study the food pyramid and discuss fat, protein and carbohydrate contents in foods they eat on a daily basis. From here, students are asked to start a food diary where they note down each fat, protein and carbohydrate content they eat per meal and then calculate the total amount eaten. Students can then compare amounts with other students and then discuss ways in which they can substitute foods to increase healthiness. Extension: Students to research healthy food to promote optimum physical activity. Students can then use physical activity to collate data about their physical health, for example, timed sprints, number of sit ups, star jumps etc.

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Why use Integrated Learning?Integrated learning closely mimics real life in that it shows a connection between curricula, thus enables students to better prepare for inquiring, problem solving and understanding across subjects in the real world (Murdoch, 2003). Students are able to improve skills such as creativity, adaptability, collaboration and critical reasoning and understanding through integrated learning. This type of learning also improves students engagements within the lessons and a willingness to learn (Edutopia, 2008).

What is Integrated Learning?Integrated learning is a theory and practice which looks at combining curricula throughout lessons in order to produce a connection across subjects (Brady, 2014). It brings subjects together that are not usually associated with each other in order for students to grasp a more authentic, real-world understanding and therefore resulting in an interdisciplinary education. This is especially important for 21st century learning where multiple subject knowledge is used to solve real world problems (The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat, 2010)

Multiple Integrations Throughout the examples given, it is shown that multiple subject areas are integrated into the same lessons. Although there are two main subject focus points, all lesson incorporate the use of literacy through writing reports, outomes, data representation, etc while maintaining majority focus on mathematics. Although the students are concentrating on the task at hand, they are not realising that they are using prior knowledge from across the curricula to help problem solve and be successfull in the task at hand. This is integrated learning which results in students being better prepared for their future endeavours.

Math is fun! - An integrated approach.So how can we use integrated learning in a commonly hated subject; Mathematics? Mathematics can be integrated into almost all other curricula subjects. On this poster, you will find many examples of how to use integrated learning throughout the classroom to incorporate maths into other disciplinary lessons. A few classroom lessons include...

“Research has consistently shown thatstudents in integrated programs demonstrateacademic performance equal to, orbetter than, students in discipline-basedprograms. In addition, students are moreengaged in school, and less prone toattendance and behaviour problems.”(Drake & Reid, 2010)


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