ICP Project Talha Balci

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Discipline:
Science
Subject:
Chemistry
Grade:
12

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ICP Project Talha Balci

Air Bag SafetyBy: Talha Balci Period: 1December 18th, 2015

Airbags are a safety device fitted inside a road vehicle, consisting of a cushion designed to inflate rapidly in the event of a collision and positioned so that the drivers to get flung out of their vehicle. Unlike traditional seatbelts, airbags are designed to activate automatically.

Newtons Laws

People inside a moving car have mass and velocity too and, even if the car stops, they'll tend to keep on going. Cars have had seatbelts for decades, but they're a fairly crude form of protection. The biggest problem is that they restrain only your body. Your head weighs as much as several bags of sugar,and isn't restrained at all. So even if your body is fastened tight, the same basic law of physics says your head will keep on going and smash into the steering wheel or the glass windshield.

Airbag systems typically consist of mulitple sensors, a control module, and at least one airbag. Most sensors are generally placed in positions that are likely to be comprimised with the accident, and data from accelerometers, wheel speed sensors, and other sources can be monitored by the airbag control unit

Chest injury from “shotgun impact” and chemical danger from the propellants used to attain the airbag’s inflation speed. It’s generally agreed that these potential dangers are outweighed by the safety benefits of airbags.

Risks, dangers, and precautions

What Are Airbags?

How do they work?

Why do we use them?

The purpose of an airbag is to help the passenger reduce their speed in collision without getting injured.

Relation to Force & Momentum

What are smart Airbags?

A smart airbag is one that features a sensitive computer that monitors the size and position of the occupant of the seat in which the airbag will deploy it

There's two main concepts here: impulse (change in momentum) and pressure (force over some area).


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