Icons

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by leahroper7
Last updated 3 years ago

Discipline:
Social Studies
Subject:
World History
Grade:
8

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Icons

In Christianity, an icon is a flat picture of Christ, Mary, or other saints. Most icons are painted in egg tempura on wood, but some are created with mosaic tiles, ivory or other materials. In Orthodox Christianity, icons are sacred works of art that provide inspiration and connect the worshiper with the spiritual world. It seems that the tradition od showing respect and veneration to images developed gradually and s natural consequence of cultural norms.

More Icons

"It would be natural that people who bowed and kissed, incensed the imperial eagles and images of Caesar (with no suspicion of anything idolatry) who paid elaborate reverance to an empty throne as his symbol, should give the same signs to the Cross, the images of Christ, and the alter.

The Legend of the Icon

A legend passed down for nearly 2,oo years describes the first icon. At the time when Christ was traveling to Jerusalem where he would experience the trial and crucifixion, king Abgar of Edessa sent for Jesus. Christ could not go to the king so instead He sent a linen cloth on which He had dried His face. The story continues that the cloth carried to the King had an impression of Christ's face on it. The King's ilness was healed when the cloth was taken to him. The first icon, "not made by human hands" bagan a tradition of portraying Christ and the saints in pictorial fashion. The entire town of Edessa treasured the first icon, that is the linen cloth with Christ's face on it. It was widely acknowledged throughout the East and still written about in the 18th century.

Citations

-youtube-http://www.antiochian.org/icons-eastern-orthodoxy

ICONS By: Leah Roper

All About Icons

Say What?

Why study Icons?

By the 18th century, icons had become a major part of eastern devotion. The walls of the churches were covered inside from the floor to the roof with icons, scenes from the Bible, and allegorical groups.


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