How Do People Share Their Culture?

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by JennaLovell
Last updated 4 years ago

Discipline:
Resources & Tools
Subject:
Lesson Planning
Grade:
3,4,5,6

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How Do People Share Their Culture?

How Do People Share Their Culture?

About the Resource: This resource has been taken directly from the NL prescribed Social Studies text for Grade 3. The resource is a lesson plan designed to teach students about how people share their culture. The lesson plan targets outcomes specified in the NL Grade 3 Social Studies curriculum.

Grade Level:This resource has been designed for third grade students in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. However, the resource is appropriate for students in any part of the world. While the resource has been designed for grade three, it could also be used from grades four to six. The structure of the resource (getting students to share information about themselves, using prior knowledge to understand new knowledge, and working collaboritively togehter) can be utilized in any grade level and be successful. However, we believe students in grades 3 - 6 would benefit from this type of lesson as students at this age level are more aware of themselves as members of society and will better understand concepts of how the past affects the present.

Strengths- The resource gets students working collaboratively. Students work together as a group to determine what is meant by the term culture. Students learn in a fun, collaborative way as opposed to reading from a textbook and answering questions. While reading from the text is an aspect of this resource, it is done in a way that is collaborative and fun! - While this resouce does not explicitly focus on aboriginal peoples and their cultures, they are acknowledged. One thing we really like about this resource is that no particular culture is focused on. The structure of the resource makes it easy to incorporate information about all peoples and their cultures. - The resource suggests teaching the information to students in a way that enables them to make personal connections to the information they are learning about. The structure of the lesson puts students at the forefront and truly puts the social back in social studies. If a lesson were to be carried out in the same manner the resource suggests, students would be sharing information about their own cultures with one another and making connections between their personal knowledge and the information being presented to them.

Rationale: We chose this resource because we firmly believe in the need to put the social back in social studies! After reviewing the textbook and teacher resource guide we have concluded that there is sufficient information incoprorated within both. Since this was the case, we decided to find a resource provided within these texts, When we reflect back on Social Studies we primarily remember reading information from the textbook and simply answering questions on what we had just read. There were no discussions or opportunities to make personal connections to the materials. Our chosen resource jumped out to us primarily because it centred highly around student discussions, allowed students to share information about their own experiences and culture, and allowed them to make personal connections to the information being learned. It is very encouraging to see that even within the existing problematic curriculum texts there are silver linings such as the resource we have chosen. While our resource does not explicitly focus on aboriginal peoples and their cultures it is easy to modify the lesson and integrate information about aboriginal peoples ways of being.

Weaknesses In our opinion, this resource is too flexible. While this is good for teachers (like ourselves) who are looking for lesson plans that can be modified to integrate information about indigenous peoples, the resource could be used just as it is presented in the text by other teachers who are not committed to educating their students about indigenous peoples and cultures. We believe the sharing of culture is such a strong and prevalent aspect of indigenous peoples, so in our opinon this resource should have highlighted the ways of sharing culture by indigenous peoples..

Modifying the Resource: One of the reasons we believe this is such a strong resource is because it has the potential to be made into something really great. As mentioned above, we believe the sharing of culture is a strong and prominent aspect of indigenous peoples and their cultures. Thus, we have decided to modify the lesson to integrate information about indigenous peoples. We would utilize this resource in our own classrooms by beginning the class with a check-in circle where the students would each discuss something they have learned from an older relative (a parent, an aunt or uncle, a grandparent, etc), reading the book Morning on the Lake to students, and then discussing similarities they noticed between their own experiences and the text. We would also direct the students' focus to the information the child learns from his grandparent to further the students' knowledge of indigenous peoples and their beliefs. As in the resource, we would keep student discussion and collaboration at the forefront of this lesson.

By Jenna Lovell & Chelsea Myles


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